Processing Your Order...

New Customers get 1-cent Shipping on $49+* with code 1CWELCOME

1-cent Shipping on $49+* with code 1CWELCOME

*New customers only. Order must be placed by 11/26/2017. Applies to standard shipping only. Order must be at least $49 excluding shipping and tax. Expedited shipping options may require an additional charge. Not applicable to Hawaii and Alaska orders. A standard shipping charge will appear at checkout but the promo code will credit an amount back so that you pay 1 cent for shipping. Promotion does not apply to corporate orders. Not valid on Bordeaux Futures.

Due to state regulations, we cannot ship wine to California

Granrojo Garnacha 2005

Grenache from Spain
    0% ABV
    Ships Fri, Dec 1
    Limit 0 bottles per customer
    Sold in increments of 0
    Currently Unavailable $9.99
    Try the
    16
    9 99
    Save $6.01 (38%)
    Add to Cart
    1
    3.8 12 Ratings
    Share
    Vintage Alert
    Alert me when new vintages are available
    Rate for better recommendations
    3.8 12 Ratings
    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    The 2005 Rojo Garnacha has the color of blackberry with blue tones, almost opaque. Intense and pleasant aromas of licorice and wild red and black berries fill the nose, with mineral undertones. Well-rounded and balanced on the palate, it is elegant and fresh. Red fruit, minerals and a hint of fresh thyme linger on the finish. It's surprisingly silky and full-bodied, with a rich varietal expression.

    This wine is ideally served at room temperature with a large variety of foods, especially with red meats and all types of cheeses.

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Granrojo

    Granrojo

    View all wine
    Granrojo, , Spain
    Granrojo
    The Bodegas Bemvinas winery was founded in 1904 as a modest family enterprise by Don Juan Megia Sanchez. Throughout its first three decades, the winery's production increased to the point where it was making over 160,00 liters of wine by the 1930s. The Spanish Civil War changed the family's fortune when the winery was confiscated by the Republicans in 1936 and not returned to the Megia family until 1940 - but without the wine. The family started over, selling whole vintages in barrels, mainly in Madrid. By the 1970s, when production capacity was around 360,000 liters, the winery passed to the last living Megia, who sold it in the 1980s to the current owner, Don Doroteo Navarro Donado.

    Don Doroteo immediately implemented a number of necessary changes and improvements that brought a bout a total re-vitalization and modernization of the property, which had been renamed Bodegas Navarro Lopez after the new family owners. A strict quality policy, moving from barrels to bottles, emphasizing single-vineyard and mono-varietal wines carrying the D.O. Valdepenas, as well as important investments in state-of-the art winery equipment and technology, have been the keys to the success of Navarro Lopez as a rising star in the production of high-quality wines, in a region that is starting to be recognized as an important wine region in Spain.

    In the early 1990s, Don Doroteo bought two other wineries in the area, Bodegas Canadas and the Bodegas Nieto, greatly extending the Estate's vineyard acerage and the type of grapes grown. The Estate consists today of 150 hectares, mostly planted to Tempranillo (Cencibel), Garnacha and Macabeo grapes, with over 8 million liters produced. Nearly 90% of the Navarro Lopez wines are red - and the majority of those are 100% Tempranillo or a blend with Tempranillo as the base grape.

    The next generation of the family has become involved in the winery with Don Doroteo's two sons, Francisco and Jose Vicente Navarro Lopez, taking active roles in the production, marketing and sales of Navarro Lopez wines.

    Famous for its food-friendly, approachable wines and their storied history, Chianti is perhaps the best-known wine region of Italy. This sub-zone of Tuscany has it all—sweeping views of undulating hills, the hot Mediterranean sun, hearty cuisine, and a rich artistic heritage. Historically packaged in short, round, straw-covered bottles known as “fiaschi” and containing insipid red liquid, Chianti today is typically not your Italian grandfather’s pizza wine. The heart of the Chianti zone is known as Chianti Classico, as the region has expanded its boundaries over time to capitalize on the wine’s fame, thus diluting its reputation. Within Chianti there are seven other subzones with unique characteristics, including Colli Senesi, Colli Fiorentini, and Chianti Rufina.

    Chianti wines are made primarily of Sangiovese, with other varieties comprising up to 20% of the blend. Generally, local varieties are used, including Canaiolo, Mammolo, and Marzemino, but international varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah have also been approved in more recent years. Basic, inexpensive Chianti is simple and fruit-forward and makes a great companion to any casual dinner involving red sauce. At its apex, it is savory and rustic with high acidity, firm tannins, and notes of tart red fruit, dried herbs, fennel, salami, balsamic vinegar, and smoky tobacco. Chianti Riserva, typically the top bottling of a producer, can benefit handsomely from a decade or two of cellaring.

    Sangiovese

    View all wine

    The perfect intersection of bright fruit and savory earthiness, Sangiovese is the backbone variety in Tuscany. While it is best known as the chief component of Chianti, it reaches the height of its power and intensity in the complex, long-lived Brunello di Montalcino. Elsewhere throughout Italy, it can make inexpensive wines for daily consumption ranging from inoffensive to deliciously easy. On the French island of Corsica, under the name Nielluccio, it produces excellent bright and refreshing red and rosé wines with a personality of their own. Sangiovese has also enjoyed moderate popularity in California and Washington State over the last few decades.

    In the Glass

    Sangiovese is a medium-bodied red with savory flavors of tart cherry, plum, tomato, fresh tobacco, anise, thyme, oregano, and dried earth. High-quality, well-aged examples will take on notes of smoke, clay pot, leather, gamey meat, potpourri, and dried fruits. Corsican Nielluccio is distinguished by a subtle perfume of dried flowers.

    Perfect Pairings

    Sangiovese is the ultimate pizza and pasta red—its high acidity, moderate alcohol, and grainy tannins create an affinity with tomato-based dishes, spicy meats, and anything off the barbecue.

    Sommelier Secret

    Although it is the star variety of Tuscany, cult-classic “Super-Tuscan” wines may contain no Sangiovese at all! Since the 1970s, local winemakers have been producing big, bold wines (with price tags to match) that are typically monovarietal or a blend of one or more of several international varieties—usually Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, or Syrah—with or without Sangiovese.

    FWTNAVLOPEZGREN_2005 Item# 89626

    Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

    It's easy to update and using the latest version
    of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

    Yes, Update Now