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Graffigna Centenario Reserve Pinot Grigio 2011

Pinot Gris/Grigio from Argentina
    13.5% ABV
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    13.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Elegant, harmonious and delicate, full of fresh flower and fruit aromas, this young, aromatic and subtle wine is the product of the utmost care and exclusive treatment.

    Bright clear gold. Hints of jasmine and notes of white fruits like peach and apricot, with a refined finish.

    Pair with stews, seasoned ethnic food, such as Peruvian, Mexican and Indian, as well as Asian dishes and cheeses.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Graffigna

    Graffigna Winery

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    Graffigna Winery, Argentina
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    In th year 1870, Graffigna winery was founded by Italian immigrant Santiago Graffigna in San Juan, Argentina. After an earthquake devestated San Juan in 1944, the process of rebuilding and modernizing the winery began.

    Today, Graffigna's wines are the proud result of the seamless combination of technical knowledge and expertise and 140 years of genuine passion for winemaking. From the vineyard to the glass, their prestigious technical team is devoted to creating wines of the highest quality that reflect their highly unique and privileged terroir.

    Argentina

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    With vineyards tretching along the eastern side of the Andes Mountains from Patagonia in the south to Salta in the north, Argentina is one of the world’s largest and most dynamic wine producing countries—and most important in South America.

    Since the late 20th century vineyard investments, improved winery technology and a commitment to innovation have all contributed to the country’s burgeoning image as a producer of great wines at all price points. The climate here is diverse but generally continental and agreeable, with hot, dry summers and cold snowy winters—a positive, as snow melt from the Andes Mountains is used heavily to irrigate vineyards. Grapes very rarely have any difficulty achieving full ripeness.

    Argentina’s famous Mendoza region, responsible for more than 70% of Argentina’s wine production, is further divided into several sub-regions, with Luján de Cuyo and the Uco Valley most noteworthy. Red wines dominate here, especially Malbec, the country’s star variety, while Chardonnay is the most successful white.

    The province of San Juan is best known for blends of Bonarda and Syrah. Torrontés is a specialty of the La Rioja and Salta regions, the latter of which is also responsible for excellent Malbecs grown at very high elevation.

    Pinot Gris/Grigio

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    Showing a unique rosy, purplish hue upon full ripeness, this “white” variety is actually born out of a mutation of Pinot noir. The grape boasts two versions of its name, as well as two generally distinct styles. In Italy, Pinot grigio achieves most success in the mountainous regions of Trentino and Alto Adige as well as in the neighboring Friuli—all in Italy’s northeast. France's Alsace and Oregon's Willamette Valley produce some of the world's most well-regarded Pinot gris wine. California produces both styles with success.

    In the Glass

    Pinot Gris is naturally low in acidity but full ripeness is necessary to achieve and showcase its signature flavors and aromas of stone fruit, citrus, honeysuckle, pear and almond. Alsatian styles are aromatic (think rose and honey), richly textured and sometimes relatively higher in alcohol compared to its Italian counterparts. As Pinot Grigio in Italy, the style is often much lighter, charming and fruit driven.

    Perfect Pairings

    The viscosity of a typical Alsatian Pinot Gris allows it to fit in harmoniously with the region's rich foods like pork, charcuterie and foie gras. Pinot Grigio, on the other hand, with its lean, crisp, citrusy freshness, works well as an aperitif wine or with seafood and subtle chicken dishes.

    Sommelier Secret

    Given the color of its berries and aromatic and characterful potential if cared for as it is allowed to fully ripen, the Pinot grigio variety is actually one that is commonly used to make "orange wines." An orange wine is a white wine made in the red wine method, i.e. with fermentation on its skins. This process leads to a wine with more ephemeral aromas, complexity on the palate and a pleasant, light orange hue.

    RPT99064396_2011 Item# 115053