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Georg Albrecht Schneider Niersteiner Hipping Riesling Spatlese 2015

Riesling from Germany
  • WS92
  • WE90
  • RP89
9% ABV
Other Vintages
  • WE89
  • WE90
  • W&S90
  • WE91
  • W&S90
  • WS92
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4.0 8 Ratings
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4.0 8 Ratings
9% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The steep Hipping vineyard, known as the red slope, der roter Hang, is rated as one of the best in Germany, producing Riesling with spicy mineral flavors, exotic and pronounced ripe fruit with excellent maturing potential as the site sometimes produces a wine that is slow to show its true promise. The slope itself is warmed by the early morning sunshine and the red sandstone soil retains the warmth. The proximity to the Rhine protects the foliage from early fall cold nights and allows for a long growing season.

Hints of pine frond, earth, and smoke entice on the nose of this unusual, remarkably well-priced Riesling. Semi-sweet in style, it’s rich and creamy on the palate with luscious peach and grapefruit flavors. It’s surprisingly nuanced too, exposing layers of steel, crushed mineral, and acid that meld beautifully through a long finish.

A perfect match for strong Indian and Asian spiced dishes. Also fantastic with a spiced duck leg, dishes with acidic sauces, roasted vegetables, and soft cheeses.

Critical Acclaim

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WS 92
Wine Spectator
Laced with pink grapefruit and peach flavors, this white is sleek and taut, with vivid acidity stretching the finish. Brown spice and slate accents emerge there, along with a lip-smacking feel. Drink now through 2035.
WE 90
Wine Enthusiast
Blossom and steel aromas collide in this deliciously ripe yet nuanced semisweet Riesling. While luscious yellow cherry and apricot flavors penetrate on the palate, it shows lively freshness, amplified by breathless mineral vitality.
RP 89
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Blending all the family's terraces of the cru, the 2015 Niersteiner Hipping Riesling Spätlese shows super ripe and concentrated but clear tropical fruit aromas with a subtle smokiness on the nose. On the palate, this is a crisp, piquant, juicy and aromatic Spätlese that is a great pleasure to drink even today. It has a moderate 9% alcohol, whereas the 85 grams of residual sugar are balanced by the mineral character, grip and 8.6 grams of total acidity. An excellent Spätlese indeed.
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Georg Albrecht Schneider

Georg Albrecht Schneider

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Georg Albrecht Schneider, Germany
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Albrecht Schneider's maxim has always been absolute devotion to his vineyards and wines. The estate has been owned by the Schneider family for 7 generations, and today at vintage time, three generations are at work. 15 hectares (37 acres) in Nierstein belong to the estate, over 40% of which are planted to Riesling. Red sandstone soils are predominant in the best sites that yield rich and spicy wines. 1995 marked a step forward for the estate, with more spacious underground cellars and warehousing facilities purchased in Nierstein. The old underground cellars provide ideal conditions for modern production methods.

The steep Hipping vineyard, known as the red slope, der roter Hang, is rated as one of the best in Germany, producing Riesling with spicy mineral flavors, exotic and pronounced ripe fruit with excellent maturing potential as the site sometimes produces a wine that is slow to show its true promise. The slope itself is warmed by the early morning sunshine and the red sandstone soil retains the warmth. The proximity to the Rhine protects the foliage from early fall cold nights and allows for a long growing season.

Since vintage 1997, temperature-controlled cold fermentation in stainless-steel vats has been introduced. Albrecht's wines now display even more richness and clear, ripe fruit. They are well structured with individual characteristics derived from their various single vineyard sites.

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As the world’s northernmost fine wine producing region, Germany faces some of the most extreme climatic and topographic challenges in viticulture. But fortunately this country’s star variety, Riesling, is cold-hardy enough to survive freezing winters, and has enough natural acidity to create balance, even in wines with the highest levels of residual sugar. Riesling responds splendidly to Germany’s variable terroir, allowing the country to build its reputation upon fine wines at all points of the sweet to dry spectrum, many of which can age for decades.

Classified by ripeness at harvest, Riesling can be picked early for dry wines or as late as January following the harvest for lusciously sweet wines. There are six levels in Germany’s ripeness classification, ordered from driest to sweetest: Kabinett, Spätlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese, Trockenbeerenauslese and Eiswein (ice wine). While these classifications don’t exactly match the sweetness levels of the finished wines, the Kabinett category will include the drier versions and anything above Auslese will have noticeable—if not noteworthy—sweetness. Eiswein is always remarkably sweet.

Other important white varieties include Müller-Thurgau as well as Grauburguner (Pinot Gris) and Weissburguner (Pinot Blanc). The red, Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir), grown in warmer pockets of the country can be both elegant and structured.

As the fourth largest wine producer in Europe (after France, Italy and Spain), in contrast to its more Mediterranean neighbors, Germany produces about as much as it consumes—and is also the largest importer of wine in the E.U.

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Riesling

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A regal variety of incredible purity and precision, Riesling possesses a remarkable ability to reflect the character of wherever it is grown while still maintaining easily identifiable typicity. This versatile grape can be just as enjoyable dry or sweet, young or old, still or sparkling and can age longer than nearly any other white variety. Riesling is best known in Germany and Alsace, and is also of great importance in Austria. The variety has also been particularly successful in Australia’s Clare and Eden Valleys, New Zealand, Washington, cooler regions of California, and the Finger Lakes region of New York.

In the Glass

Riesling typically produces wine with relatively low alcohol, high acidity, steely minerality and stone fruit, spice, citrus and floral notes. At its ripest, it leans towards juicy peach, nectarine and pineapple, while cooler climes produce Rieslings redolent of meyer lemon, lime and green apple. With age, Riesling can become truly revelatory, developing unique, complex aromatics, often with a hint of petrol.

Perfect Pairings

Riesling is quite versatile, enjoying the company of sweet-fleshed fish like sole, most Asian food, especially Thai and Vietnamese (bottlings with some residual sugar and low alcohol are the perfect companions for dishes with substantial spice) and freshly shucked oysters. Sweeter styles work well with fruit-based desserts.

Sommelier Secret

It can be difficult to discern the level of sweetness in a Riesling, and German labeling laws do not make things any easier. Look for the world “trocken” to indicate a dry wine, or “halbtrocken” or “feinherb” for off-dry. Some producers will include a helpful sweetness scale on the back label—happily, a growing trend.

NWWGS15HS_2015 Item# 366563