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Frescobaldi Nipozzano Chianti Rufina Riserva 2009

Sangiovese from Chianti, Tuscany, Italy
  • JS90
  • WS90
  • RP90
13.5% ABV
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3.4 13 Ratings
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3.4 13 Ratings
13.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Nipozzano 2009 is a lovely ruby-red. The nose opens with dark wild berries and cherry, hints of cotton candy and pleasant floral notes of lilac and chocolate. The spicy component emerges with nuances of clove and green peppercorn. The palate is characterized by a distinct tactile approach in which the stamp of the terroir is underlined by a lively minerality. The tannin texture is thight but not sharp, which is also an expression of the uniqueness of the soils of Nipozzano. The finish returns to the intense fruity notes already identified on the nose.

Serve with barbecued meat and beef stews or aged cheeses.

Critical Acclaim

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JS 90
James Suckling
Very fruity with blackberries and violets on the nose and palate. Full body, with modern tannins and a crisp, fruity and minerally aftertaste. This is always excellent value. Drink or hold.
WS 90
Wine Spectator
Offers mature aromas and flavors of forest floor, dried fruit, sweet spice and leather, all matched to a bright profile. Remains light-footed, lingering on the finish.
RP 90
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2009 Chianti Rufina Riserva Nipozzano is very pretty. Veins of minerality support an expressive core of dark red berries in this silky, long Chianti. The 2009 impresses for its persistence and fine overall balance. Ideally, the 2009 is enjoyed while the fruit retains its vibrancy.
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Frescobaldi

Frescobaldi

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Frescobaldi, Chianti, Tuscany, Italy
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The Marchesi de' Frescobaldi is one of Italy's oldest wineries, with a history dating to the 1300s. The family has included medieval knights, bankers, lawyers and patrons of the arts. The Marchesi de' Frescobaldi is one of the most significant wine producers in Italy, with nine estates—and roughly 2,500 acres—in Tuscany. The family has been growing wine since the late 19th century, when they became the first in Tuscany to import and plant French vine cuttings. Because they have been producing wines for more than 700 years, to experience Frescobaldi is to glimpse the history of Florence, from the Middle Ages to the present day.

Wine Spectator has ranked many of their offerings in the 90s and their wines are consistently listed in the magazine's Top 100 Wines of the Year, encouraging wine enthusiasts from around the globe to become familiar with some of Italy's finest wines.

Famous for its food-friendly, approachable wines and their storied history, Chianti is perhaps the best-known wine region of Italy. This appellation within Tuscany has it all: sweeping views of rolling hills, endless vineyards, the warm Mediterranean sun, hearty cuisine and a rich artistic heritage. Chianti includes seven subzones: Chianti Colli Fiorentini, Rufina, Montalbano, Colli Senesi, Colline Pisane, Colli Aretini and Montespertoli, with area beyond whose wines can be labeled simply as Chianti.

However the best quality comes from Chianti Classico, in the heart of the Chianti zone, which is no longer a subzone of the region at all but has been recognized on its own since 1996. The Classico region today is delimited by the confines of the original Chianti zone protected since the 1700s.

Chianti wines are made primarily of Sangiovese, with other varieties comprising up to 25-30% of the blend. Generally, local varieties are used, including Canaiolo, Colorino and Mammolo, but international varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah are allowed as long as they are grown within the same zone.

Basic, value-driven Chianti is simple and fruit-forward and makes a great companion to any casual dinner. At its apex, Chianti is full bodied but with good acidity, firm tannins, and notes of tart red fruit, dried herbs, fennel, balsamic and tobacco. Chianti Riserva, typically the top bottling of a producer, can benefit handsomely from a decade or two of cellaring.

Sangiovese

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The perfect intersection of bright red fruit and savory earthiness, Sangiovese is among Itaaly's elite red grape varieties and is responsible for the best red wines of Tuscany. While it is best known as the chief component of Chianti, it is also the main grape in Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and reaches the height of its power and intensity in the complex, long-lived Brunello di Montalcino

Elsewhere throughout Italy, Sangiovese plays an important role in many easy-drinking, value-driven red blends and on the French island of Corsica, under the name Nielluccio, it produces excellent bright and refreshing red and rosé wines with a personality of their own. Sangiovese has also enjoyed success growing in California and Washington.

In the Glass

Sangiovese is a medium-bodied red with qualities of tart cherry, plum, sun dried tomato, fresh tobacco and herbs. High-quality, well-aged examples can take on tertiary notes of smoke, leather, game, potpourri and dried fruit. Corsican Nielluccio is distinguished by a subtle perfume of dried flowers.

Perfect Pairings

Sangiovese is the ultimate pizza and pasta red—its high acidity, moderate alcohol, and fine-grained tannins create a perfect symbiosis with tomato-based dishes, braised vegetables, roasted and cured meat, hard cheese and anything off the barbecue.

Sommelier Secret

Although it is the star variety of Tuscany, cult-classic “Super-Tuscan” wines may actually contain no Sangiovese at all! Since the 1970s, local winemakers have been producing big, bold wines as a blend of one or more of several international varieties—usually Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot or Syrah—with or without Sangiovese.

CGM16393_2009 Item# 121424