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Freemark Abbey Napa Valley Merlot 2001

Merlot from Napa Valley, California
  • WE91
0% ABV
  • JS93
  • RP92
  • JS90
  • D90
  • WE90
  • WE90
  • WE94
  • WE89
  • CG88
  • W&S90
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Currently Unavailable $27.99
Try the 2013 Vintage 29 99
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0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Intriguing nose of plum, cherry, cranberry and woodsy spice. Appealing black cherry flavors, with a soft lingering finish of dark chocolate, and a hint of toasted nuts. Aged in both American and French oak. Great with steak.

Critical Acclaim

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WE 91
Wine Enthusiast
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Freemark Abbey

Freemark Abbey

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Freemark Abbey, Napa Valley, California
Video of winery

The history of Freemark Abbey began in 1886, when Josephine Marlin Tychson became the first woman to build and operate a winery in California. The historic site where Josephine's winery, Tychson Cellars, once stood is now known as Freemark Abbey.

Josephine, a native of San Lorenzo, California and her husband, John Tychson, a Danish immigrant, moved to St. Helena in 1881. For $8,500, they purchased 147 acres north of St. Helena, which later became known as "Tychson Hill".

Shortly after her husband's untimely death, Josephine began construction of a fifty square foot redwood winery which would grow to hold a capacity of about 30,000 gallons. In addition, she hired Nils Larsen, an experienced vintner, as her foreman. Josephine successfully produced wine for the next eight years and then sold the winery to Larsen in 1894. In turn, Larsen leased the winery to Antonio Forni, a good friend of Josephine's. Forni later purchased the property in 1898. Forni is responsible for building a new winery on the old site of the Tychson structure.

In the years that followed, Freemark Abbey went through a period of several different owners until 1966, when a group of partners purchased the winery. In 1993, Winemaker Ted Edwards became a partner. Edwards assumed the role of managing partner in addition to maintaining the responsibilities he has held as winemaker since 1985.

Napa Valley

Red Wine

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Undoubtedly proving its merit over and over, Napa Valley is a now a leading force in the world of prestigious red wine regions. Although George Yount planted the first vineyard in the valley in the mid-1830s, and land under vine increased over the next 130 years, it wasn’t until the 1960s and 70s that Napa Valley began to show the world its ability to compete—and win—against other esteemed regions of the world. The victory of the Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars 1973 Cabernet Sauvignon in the 1976 Judgement of Paris, followed by Robert Parker’s 100-point perfect score awarded to the Groth 1985 Cabernet Sauvignon brought much deserved acclaim to the valley.

Though Cabernet Sauvignon undoubtedly still dominates Napa Valley in every way, covering half of the land under vine, commanding the highest prices per ton and enjoying plenty of recognition, other red varieties certainly thrive here as well. Important but often overlooked include Merlot, and other Bordeaux varieties well-regarded for single varietal wines or for their blending capacities. Very old vine Zinfandel still exists in the valley and in its mountain appellations, representing an important historical stronghold for the region. Pinot noir can be produced but mainly in the cooler southern parts of the valley close to the San Pablo Bay.

What makes Napa such an amazing place for the production of red wines? Perfectly situated running north to south, the valley acts as a corridor, pulling cool, moist air up from the San Pablo Bay in the evenings during the hot days of the growing season. This action leads to a diurnal temperature shift ideal for the even and slow ripening of its grapes. Furthermore the valley and its more mountainous sub appellations claim over 100 soil variations including layers of volcanic, gravel, sand and silt—a combination excellent for world-class red wine production.

CAR34935_2001 Item# 80805