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Folonari Chardonnay 1997

Chardonnay from Italy
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    Winemaker Notes

    COLOR: Golden.

    BOUQUET: Fresh, fragrant, with aromas of apples and spice.

    TASTE: Clean and crisp, with an elegant finish of ripe fruit.

    GASTRONOMIC SUGGESTIONS: Fish, chicken, seafood.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Folonari

    Folonari

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    Folonari, Italy
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    The history of Folonari dates from 1825, when Francesco Folonari founded the firm in Valcamonica in the Veneto. In the latter half of the 19th century, he and his sons moved to Brescia, establishing one of Italy's first winemaking facilities. They pioneered the production and distribution of wine in bottle, thus making it possible for consumers to drink wines of good and constant quality on an everyday basis. This philosophy continues to guide the firm today as it offers a range of typical regional wines from the most popular viticultural areas.

    Folonari Soave is the daily choice of many discriminating wine drinkers, an easy; gentle dry wine, which everyone will enjoy. Pinot Grigio is a fresh, dry varietal with a subtle touch of almonds, grown in the Veneto district, and the perfect step up from Folonari Soave. Compare Folonari Pinot Grigio to examples selling several times its modest price! Merlot, a soft, round red wine pleasing to all palates, is a terrific bargain in a variety, and still very fashionable. In keeping with their tradition of assuring value for money, Folonari also offers a delicious Cabernet Sauvignon at a fraction of the cost of comparable wines as well as other selections in keeping with their tradition of assuring value for money.

    Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture that is virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes are grown just about everywhere throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. The defining geographical feature of the country is the Apennine Mountain range, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south. The island of Sicily nearly grazes the toe of Italy’s boot, while Sardinia lies to the country’s west. Climate varies significantly throughout the country, with temperature being somewhat more dependent on elevation than latitude, though it is safe to generalize that the south is warmer. Much of the highest quality viticulture takes place on gently rolling, picturesque hillsides.

    Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but their use is declining in popularity, especially as younger growers begun to take interest in rediscovering forgotten local specialties. Sangiovese is the most widely planted variety in the country, reaching its greatest potential in parts of Tuscany. Nebbiolo is the prized grape of Piedmont in the northwest, producing singular, complex and age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Montepulciano, Trebbiano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and of course, Pinot Grigio.

    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

    CLW347477_1997 Item# 15496