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Feudi del Pisciotto Alberta Ferretti Chardonnay 2013

Chardonnay from Sicily, Italy
  • JS90
14% ABV
  • WS91
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14% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Straw yellow with green shades. Notes of peach and pineapple, the wine is fresh and savory. This wine shows wonderful acidity that offers freshness and also makes it suitable for aging.

A great companion to seafood, white meat and a variety of appetizers.

Critical Acclaim

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JS 90
James Suckling
This shows aromas of poached apples with lemon peel and a salt-like note. Full, ripe and dense in terms of fruit. Dry fruit finish.
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Feudi del Pisciotto

Feudi del Pisciotto

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Feudi del Pisciotto, Sicily, Italy
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Feudi del Pisciotto consists of 82 acres of vineyards planted in 2002 that sit at 820 feet above sea level just under four miles as the crow flies from the sea. The property, therefore, benefits from two climatic moderators: the elevation, which allows the vineyards to enjoy the sea breeze, and the sea itself, a great mitigator of temperature.

Located inside the triangle created by Piazza Almerina (known for its extraordinary and intact Roman villa), Caltagirone (famous for its ceramics) and Vittoria (famous for Cerasuolo di Vittoria, the only Sicilian DOCG), the vineyards of Feudi del Pisciotto dedicate half their vines to the red wine king of the island, Nero d’Avola, and half to international varieties such as Cabernet, Merlot, Semillon and Gewürztraminer. Inside the winery, Feudi del Pisciotto prides itself on combining history with high technology in the cellar in order to reach the highest levels of the Sicilian wine production.

Part of the Pisciotto reserve, famous for its beauty, the abundance of cork oaks and the presence of many other species of vegetation, Feudi del Pisciotto also enjoys relicts of its long history, including an extraordinary millstone that was once used by the ancient Romans to make wine.

A large, geographically and climatically diverse island off the toe of Italy, Sicily has long been recognized for its fortified Marsala wines. It is also home to red and white table wines that have been steadily increasing in quality and popularity over the past few decades, allowing Italy’s fourth largest wine-producing region to shed its former image as merely a supplier of bulk wine. Certainly, plenty of bulk wine is still made here, but those who look beyond that will find plenty of high-quality wines for every-day drinking as well as bottles from boutique producers who espouse thoughtful vineyard practices (the organic wine movement thrives here). Though most think of the climate here as simply hot and dry, there is some variation on the sun-drenched island, particularly at high elevation on the slopes of Mount Etna.

Although Sicily’s comeback began with clever labels and easily recognizable international varieties, its charm lies in its indigenous grapes. Nero d’Avola is the most widely planted red variety, responsible for full-bodied, berry fruited wines throughout the island. In Cerasuolo di Vittoria, it is blended with the lighter, more floral Frappato to create an elegantly balanced wine. On the volcanic soils of Mount Etna, many noteworthy wines are being produced in every color—whites from Cataratto and Carricante, and rosés from Nerello Mascalese and Nerello Cappuccio. All of these wines share a racy streak of minerality and at their best can bear more than a slight resemblance to their respective Burgundies. Grillo and Inzolia, the grapes of Marsala, are used to produce generally simple, crisp dry whites. Pantelleria, a subtropical island belonging to the province of Sicily, specializes in Moscato di Pantelleria, made from the variety locally known as Zibibbo.

Chardonnay

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One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it’s grown and how it’s made. In Burgundy, Chardonnay produces some of the finest white wines in the world, typically tending towards minimal intervention in the winery and at its best resulting in remarkable longevity. This grape is popular throughout the world, but perhaps its second most important home is in California, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia, South America, South Africa, and New Zealand are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

In the Glass

When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay’s flavors tend towards grapefruit, green apple, minerals, and white stone fruit, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of fig, melon, and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut, and spice (as well as texture), while malolactic fermentation can impart soft, buttery acidity.

Perfect Pairings

Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with simple seafood, light chicken dishes, and salads. Richer Chardonnays marry well with cream or oil-based sauces.

Sommelier Secret

Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. These Old-World style wines have been dubbed the “New California Chardonnays,” and anyone who claims they do not like Chardonnay should give them a try.

HNYFDPFCY13C_2013 Item# 146707