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Flat front label of wine

Fat Bastard Merlot 2003

Merlot from France
    0% ABV
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    Currently Unavailable $9.99
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    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Intense dark ruby color, aromas of stone-fruit like plums and cherries, combine smoothly with cedar and toasty aromas. On the palate its generous, round and juicy tannins are well integrated bringing harmony and complexity.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Fat Bastard

    Fat Bastard

    View all wine
    Fat Bastard, France
    Image of winery
    Thierry Boudinaud, a renowned winemaker, was sitting in his wine cellar one winter day his friend, Guy Anderson, burst in to taste the new vintage. Guy was a rebel in the wine industry believing that quality was paramount in a wine but that the average consumer hated the traditional intimidation placed by the wine industry.

    The next day Thierry had Guy try an experimental wine he had left on the lees (yeast cells). Both friends had no idea that this would result is such a dramatic difference from the wine they tried the day before. It had a wonderful color and rich, round palate. Thierry exclaimed "now zat iz what you call eh phet bast-ard," he said in response to the wine.

    After several more glasses of this great nectar they agreed that they could not withhold it from the public. When it came to a name only one was considered: the expression that it originally evoked, "Fat bastard." Even with the unique name and the great wine the two proceeded slowly in production. The first vintage was 5,000 cases with 2,000 cases going to Peter Click, an American bloke Guy had befriended during his world wine travels. The public on both sides on the pond loved the wine. Most people bought a bottle because of the name and returned to buy cases because of the quality.

    Nearly synonymous with fine wine and all things epicurean, France has a culture of wine production and consumption that is deeply rooted in tradition. Many of the world’s most beloved grape varieties originated here, as did the concept of “terroir”—the notion that regions and vineyards convey a sense of place that is reflected in the resulting wine. Accordingly, most French wine is labeled by geographical location, rather than grape variety, which can be confusing to the general consumer, who can benefit from a general working knowledge of the major appellations. Some of the greatest wine regions in the world can be found here, including Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Rhône, and Champagne, but each part of the country has its own specialties and strengths.

    Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, always unblended, are the king and queen of Burgundy, producing elegant red and white wines with great acidity, the finest examples of which can age for decades and command astoundingly high auction prices. The same varieties, along with Pinot Meunier, are used in Champagne. Of comparable renown is Bordeaux, focused on bold, structured red wines that are almost always blends of some combination of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot, and Malbec. The primary white varieties of Bordeaux are Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon. The Rhône Valley is responsible for monovarietal Syrah in the north, while in the south it is generally blended with Grenache and Mourvèdre. White Rhône varieties include Marsanne, Roussane, and Viognier. Most of these varieties are planted throughout the country and beyond, extending their influence into both the Old and New Worlds.

    An easy-going red variety with generous fruit and a supple texture, Merlot’s subtle tannins make it perfect for early drinking and allow it to pair with a wide range of foods. One simply needs to look to Bordeaux to understand Merlot's status as a noble variety. On the region’s Right Bank, it dominates in blends with Cabernet Franc, and on the Left Bank, it plays a supporting role to (and helps soften) Cabernet Sauvignon—in both cases resulting in some of the longest-lived and highest-quality wines in the world. They are often emulated elsewhere in Bordeaux-style blends, particularly in California’s Napa Valley, where Merlot also frequently shines on its own.

    In the Glass

    Merlot is known for its soft, silky texture and approachable flavors of ripe plum, red and black cherry, and raspberry. In a cool climate, you may find earthier notes alongside dried herbs, tobacco, and tar, while Merlot from warmer regions is generally more straightforward and fruit-focused.

    Perfect Pairings

    Lamb with Merlot is an ideal match—the sweetness of the meat picks up on the sweet fruit flavors of the wine to create a harmonious balance. Merlot’s gentle tannins allow for a hint of spice and its medium weight and bright acidity permit the possibilities of simple pizza or pasta with red sauce—overall, an extremely versatile food wine.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the release of the 2004 film Sideways, Merlot's repuation has taken a big hit, and more than a decade later has yet to fully recover, though it is on its way. What many viewers didn't realize was that as much as Miles derided the variety, the prized wine of his collection—a 1961 Château Cheval Blanc—is made from a blend of Merlot and Cabernet Franc.

    WWH357FBME2_2003 Item# 75842