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Emilio Hidalgo Fino Sherry

Sherry from Jerez, Spain
  • WS90
    15% ABV
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      15% ABV

      Winemaker Notes

      All Finos develop under the veil of flor and this is evident on the nose of this wine, showing its bready, yeasty character. Opening with typical notes of green olives, this refreshing fino gives way to delicate wildflowers on the nose.

      Pairs perfectly with classic tapas but can also last the whole meal through with seafood and even sushi. This wine is meant to be served very-well chilled and can be used an aperitif as well as the most refreshing accompaniment to many classic, simple sea

      Critical Acclaim

      All Vintages
      WS 90
      Wine Spectator
      Sea salt, Brazil nut and dried chamomile notes are racy and filigreed, with a stony edge on the finish.
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      Emilio Hidalgo

      Emilio Hidalgo

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      Emilio Hidalgo, Jerez, Spain
      Image of winery
      Bodegas Emilio Hidalgo was founded in 1874 and has developed an international reputation for producing elegant, refined Sherries. Located in the historical heart of Jerez de la Frontera, the winery is housed in a late-19th century building of classic construction — thick walls, large windows, high ceilings and tiled roof — ideal for the fermentation and aging of Sherry.

      By the beginning of the 20th century the winery was already well established, with a devoted following in Spain and the U.K. By the 1970s, Bodegas Emilio Hidalgo had expanded exportation to discerning Sherry drinkers in Germany, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Italy, Denmark, the U.S. and Japan.

      Today, the fifth generation of Hidalgos runs the winery, carrying on the family’s rich Sherry-making heritage. This new generation maintains the traditions that have been carefully preserved and enriched for more than 130 years. Through their efforts, Bodegas Emilio Hidalgo continues to be recognized worldwide for its high quality and distinct style. The winery has received countless accolades from Sherry connoisseurs and top critics.

      Jerez-Manzanilla

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      Known more formally as Jerez de la Frontera, Jerez is a city in Andalucía in southwest Spain and the center of the Jerez region and sherry production. Sherry is a mere English corruption of the term Jerez, while in French, Jerez is written, Xérès. Manzanilla is the freshest style of sherry, naturally derived from the seaside town of Sanlúcar de Barrameda.

      Most sherries are dry and meant to pair alongside food but Americans have traditionally focused on the sweet ones. Sherry comes from only one place in the entire world, Andalucía, where the soil and unique seasonal changes give an unsurpassed character to its wines. The many styles change with the process of production, not really the grape, though certain styles are reserved for different grapes. The main grapes are Palomino, Pedro Ximénez and Muscat of Alexandria.

      Pedro Ximénez can make some amazing sweet sherries. Cream Sherry is technically the sweetest, darkest style of Sherry, except sometimes Pedro Ximénez can be sweeter. The rest of the styles are dry and dependent on the action of flor, which are benevolent film-forming yeasts that make a floating veil on the surface of the wine and protect it from oxidation.

      Fino, from Jerez, and Manzanilla, from the humid and cool coastal town of Sanlúcar de Barrameda, are the lightest styles and are meant to be drunk young.

      Amontillado happens when a Fino’s layer of flor fades and the wine starts to oxidize. Quite simply it is an aged Fino that has a darker color and richer palate.

      When flor yeast dies unexpectedly, the result is Palo Cortado. Palo Cortado Sherries can behave like Amontillado on the palate but often show a greater balance of richness and delicacy.

      Oloroso never develops flor but is oxidized for five to twenty five years and become aromatic and strong like a fine bourbon.

      HNYHIDFSHNVC_0 Item# 165569