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Elk Cove La Boheme Pinot Noir 2016

Other Red Blends from Willamette Valley, Oregon
  • RP92
14% ABV
  • RP92
  • RP93
  • WE92
  • WE92
  • WS93
  • RP91
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14% ABV

Winemaker Notes

With tart cherry, fir boughs, tea and sassafras on the nose, this wine has a lush and mouth-filling palate. It brims with black cherry and dried plum. Spicy notes of black pepper and anise lead to a long finish of dusty tannins.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 92
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2016 Pinot Noir la Boheme is pale to medium ruby-purple in color with a great open nose of warm black cherries and blackcurrant with touches of cardamom, cinnamon stick, dried leaves and forest floor. Light to medium-bodied, it fills the mouth with warm, spice-laced black fruits, framed with firm, fine-grained tannins and mouthwatering acidity, finishing long with earth and spicy accents.
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Elk Cove

Elk Cove Vineyards

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Elk Cove Vineyards, Willamette Valley, Oregon
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Elk Cove Vineyards is one of Oregon's oldest and most respected wine producers. Founded in 1974 by Pat and Joe Campbell, their focus has always been to produce handcrafted, estate-grown wines that can rival the best in the world. Estate vineyards now cover over 250 acres on five separate sites in the Northern Willamette Valley. Steep south-facing slopes of Willakenzie, Laurelwood and now Jory soil types provide excellent drainage, which are the perfect environment to grow world-class wine grapes. Winemaker Adam Godlee Campbell joined forces with his parents in 1995 and now directs the production of outstanding Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Riesling and Pinot Blanc.

The name "Elk Cove" was derived from the Roosevelt Elk, which roamed nearby, and migrated into the valley each spring.

Willamette Valley

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One of Pinot Noir’s most successful New World outposts, the Willamette Valley is the largest and most important AVA in Oregon. With a continental climate moderated by the influence of the Pacific Ocean, it is perfect for cool-climate viticulture and the production of elegant wines.

Mountain ranges bordering three sides of the valley, particularly the Chehalem Mountains, provide the option for higher-elevation vineyard sites.

The valley's three prominent soil types (volcanic, sedimentary and silty, loess) make it unique and create significant differences in wine styles among its vineyards and sub-AVAs. The iron-rich, basalt-based, Jory volcanic soils found commonly in the Dundee Hills are rich in clay and hold water well; the chalky, sedimentary soils of Ribbon Ridge, Yamhill-Carlton and McMinnville encourage complex root systems as vines struggle to search for water and minerals. In the most southern stretch of the Willamette, the Eola-Amity Hills sub-AVA soils are mixed, shallow and well-drained. The Hills' close proximity to the Van Duzer Corridor (which became its own appellation as of 2019) also creates grapes with great concentration and firm acidity, leading to wines that perfectly express both power and grace.

Though Pinot noir enjoys the limelight here, Pinot gris, Pinot blanc and Chardonnay also thrive in the Willamette. Increasing curiosity has risen recently in the potential of others like Grüner Veltliner, Chenin blanc and Gamay.

Other Red Blends

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

NWWEL16LB6_2016 Item# 511743