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Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler Bernkasteler alte Badstube am Doctorberg Spatlese 2011

Riesling from Mosel, Germany
  • WS92
  • W&S92
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Winemaker Notes

The Doctorberg Riesling Spätlese comes with yellow and ripe fruit like ripe pineapple, peach and apricot. The full-flavored taste of this Spätlese permits the epicure to envision the sweet and juicy Riesling berries of which this wine was made of.

This Riesling wine fits extraordinarily well to all kinds of menus, for dishes that either fine or hearty. Good with lobster and other shellfish.

Critical Acclaim

WS 92
Wine Spectator

Apple and white cherry flavors are well-rounded in this juicy style. Glazed apricot lingers on the lacy finish, with notes of mango and passion fruit.

W&S 92
Wine & Spirits

Imagine a strudel filled with roasted apples, peaches, figs and toasted walnuts, and you'll have an idea of the flavors of this wine. But rather than sweet, this is ripe, a characteristic that reads in its size and the roundness of its edges. It has the structure to take on roast duck.

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Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler

Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler

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Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler, , Germany
Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler
The passion for good and great wine is practically inborn in the owners of the wine estate. Dr. Peter Pauly, born in 1939, has a Ph.D. in agricultural science and is the offspring of the long-standing wine families Bergweiler and Prüm, first mentioned in official records in 1156.

Dr. Pauly's grandfather, Zacharias Bergweiler, was for many decades one of the most respected wine-growers on the Mosel. It was the grandfather's wine estate which Dr. Pauly took over while still a student, subsequently completing his doctorate and writing a thesis on the economic opportunities offered by the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer wine-growing region.

The vineyards are mainly on steep, difficult-to-cultivate river valley hillsides and are planted predominantly with late maturity Riesling grapes, which place high demands on their location. A small percentage of the vineyards are planted with Müller-Thurgau and Spätburgunder (like Pinot Noir), which are bottled either as a remarkable red wine, as a Weissherbst (a special rosé) or as a pressed white summer wine. These wines have proven to be popular additions to the already diversified collection of Riesling white wines.

Australia

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A large, climatically diverse country producing just about every wine style imaginable, Australia is often misunderstood by consumers. It is not just a source of blockbuster Shiraz or inexpensive wine with cute critters on the label, though both can certainly be found here. It is impossible to make generalizations about a country this physically massive, but most regions are concentrated in the south of the country and experience either warm, dry weather, or more humid, tropical influence. Australia has for several decades been at the forefront of winemaking technology and has widely adopted the use of screwcaps, even for some premium and ultra-premium bottles.

Shiraz is indeed Australia’s most celebrated and widely planted variety, typically producing bold, supple reds with sweet, jammy fruit and performing best in the Barossa and Hunter Valleys. Cabernet Sauvignon is often blended with Shiraz, and also shines on its own particularly in Coonawarra and Margaret River. Grenache and Mourvèdre (often locally referred to as Mataro) are also popular, both on their own and alongside Shiraz in Rhône blends. Chardonnay is common throughout the country and made in a wide range of styles. Sauvignon Blanc has recently surged in popularity to compete with New Zealand’s distinctive version, and Semillon is often utilized as its blending partner, or in the Hunter Valley, on its own to make complex, age-worthy whites. Riesling thrives in the cool-climate Clare and Eden Valleys. Sticky-sweet fortified wine Rutherglen Muscat is a beloved regional specialty of Victoria. Thanks to the country’s relatively agreeable climate throughout and the openness of its people, experimentation is common and ongoing and there is a vast array of intriguing varieties to be found.

Petite Sirah

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With its deep color, rich texture, firm tannin, and bold flavors, there is nothing petite about Petite Sirah. The variety was originally known as Durif, but took on its more popular moniker when it was imported to California from France in 1884. Despite its origins, it has since become known as a quintessentially Californian grape. It has been commonly utilized as a blending partner for softer Zinfandel and other varieties, but has also found success as a single varietal wine. It is most commonly grown in Lodi and the Central Valley, and to an extent in Sonoma and Napa counties.

In the Glass

Petite Sirah wines are typically deep, dark, rich, and inky, with concentrated flavors of blueberry, plum, backberry, black pepper, sweet baking spice, leather, and cigar box, and chewy, chocolatey tannins. Notes of vanilla and coconut can be found in examples with significant amounts of new oak.

Perfect Pairings

Petite Sirah’s full body and bold fruit make it an ideal match for barbecue, especially brisket with a slightly sweet sauce, and other rich meat dishes. The variety’s heavy tannins call for fatty protein and strong flavors that won’t get drowned out by the wine.

Sommelier Secret

Don’t get Petite Sirah confused with Syrah—it is not, as the name might seem to imply, a smaller version of Syrah. It is, however, the offspring of Syrah (crossed with an obscure French variety called Peloursin), so the two grapes do share some characteristics despite being completely distinct varieties.

NWWPB11DS_2011 Item# 121130

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