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Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler Bernkasteler alte Badstube am Doctorberg Spatlese 2009

Riesling from Mosel, Germany
  • WS92
  • W&S91
0% ABV
  • WS92
  • W&S92
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Winemaker Notes

This is a full-bodied, rich, and complex wine with great depth and charm as it ages. The Bernkasteler alte Badstube am Doctorberg wines have always had a very long potential and mature to greater heights as they age.

Dr.Pauly-Bergweiler is the only winemaker that has "Bernkasteler alte Badstube am Doctorberg" in the US and they consider the Doctorberg the best location on their estate. The stony, blue-gray slate, weathered soil has a particularly good heat storage capacity and gives the wine a high degree of minerality and finesse.

Critical Acclaim

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WS 92
Wine Spectator
There's weight here, with a creamy texture enveloping the Jonagold apple, apricot and candied orange flavors. This is immediately appealing, yet should develop also, thanks to the bright structure. Fine length. Drink now through 2028.
W&S 91
Wine & Spirits
The vibrant acidity makes this feel drier than expected, balancing the perfumed notes of pear, litchi and kumquat. It finishes with clear, cool notes of slate, all of its components harmoniously in place.
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Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler

Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler

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Dr. Pauly-Bergweiler, Mosel, Germany
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The passion for good and great wine is practically inborn in the owners of the wine estate. Dr. Peter Pauly, born in 1939, has a Ph.D. in agricultural science and is the offspring of the long-standing wine families Bergweiler and Prüm, first mentioned in official records in 1156.

Dr. Pauly's grandfather, Zacharias Bergweiler, was for many decades one of the most respected wine-growers on the Mosel. It was the grandfather's wine estate which Dr. Pauly took over while still a student, subsequently completing his doctorate and writing a thesis on the economic opportunities offered by the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer wine-growing region.

The vineyards are mainly on steep, difficult-to-cultivate river valley hillsides and are planted predominantly with late maturity Riesling grapes, which place high demands on their location. A small percentage of the vineyards are planted with Müller-Thurgau and Spätburgunder (like Pinot Noir), which are bottled either as a remarkable red wine, as a Weissherbst (a special rosé) or as a pressed white summer wine. These wines have proven to be popular additions to the already diversified collection of Riesling white wines.

Following the Mosel River as it slithers and weaves dramatically through the Eifel Mountains in Germany’s far west, the Mosel wine region is considered by many as the source of the world’s finest and longest-lived Rieslings.

Mosel’s unique and unsurpassed combination of geography, geology and climate all combine together to make this true. Many of the Mosel’s best vineyard sites are on the steep south or southwest facing slopes, where vines receive up to ten times more sunlight, a very desirable condition in this cold climate region. Given how many twists and turns the Mosel River makes, it is not had to find a vineyard with this exposure. In fact, the Mosel’s breathtakingly steep slopes of rocky, slate-based soils straddle the riverbanks along its entire length. These rocky slate soils, as well as the river, retain and reflect heat back to the vineyards, a phenomenon that aids in the complete ripening of its grapes.

Riesling is by far the most important and prestigious grape of the Mosel, grown on approximately 60% of the region’s vineyard land—typically on the desirable sites that provide the best combination of sunlight, soil type and altitude. The best Mosel Rieslings—dry or sweet—express marked acidity, low alcohol, great purity and intensity with aromas and flavors of wet slate, citrus and stone fruit. With age, the wine’s color will become more golden and pleasing aromas of honey, dried apricot and sometimes petrol develop.

Other varieties planted in the Mosel include Müller-Thurgau, Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir) and Weissburgunder (Pinot Blanc), all performing quite well here.

Riesling

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A regal variety of incredible purity and precision, Riesling possesses a remarkable ability to reflect the character of wherever it is grown while still maintaining easily identifiable typicity. This versatile grape can be just as enjoyable dry or sweet, young or old, still or sparkling and can age longer than nearly any other white variety. Riesling is best known in Germany and Alsace, and is also of great importance in Austria. The variety has also been particularly successful in Australia’s Clare and Eden Valleys, New Zealand, Washington, cooler regions of California, and the Finger Lakes region of New York.

In the Glass

Riesling typically produces wine with relatively low alcohol, high acidity, steely minerality and stone fruit, spice, citrus and floral notes. At its ripest, it leans towards juicy peach, nectarine and pineapple, while cooler climes produce Rieslings more redolent of meyer lemon, lime and green apple. With age, Riesling can become truly revelatory, developing unique, complex aromatics, often with a hint of petrol.

Perfect Pairings

Riesling is quite versatile, enjoying the company of sweet-fleshed fish like sole, most Asian food, especially Thai and Vietnamese (bottlings with some residual sugar and low alcohol are the perfect companions for dishes with substantial spice) and freshly shucked oysters. Sweeter styles work well with fruit-based desserts.

Sommelier Secret

It can be difficult to discern the level of sweetness in a Riesling, and German labeling laws do not make things any easier. Look for the world “trocken” to indicate a dry wine, or “halbtrocken” or “feinherb” for off-dry. Some producers will include a helpful sweetness scale on the back label—happily, a growing trend.

NWWPB11DS_2009 Item# 121117