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Domaine Zafeirakis Chardonnay 2015

Chardonnay from Greece
    12.5% ABV
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    12.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Critical Acclaim

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    Domaine Zafeirakis

    Domaine Zafeirakis

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    Domaine Zafeirakis, Greece
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    A unique winery for its standards was established in Tyrnavos region in 2012. The Zafeiraki Winery is located in region "Palaiomylos" in Tyrnavos. The soil is characterized as clay with high concentration of flint stone. With respect to the environment, our aim is to highlight the unique micro-climate in the region of Tyrnavos.

    The methodology of the bio-culture in our vineyards together with the non-use of specific fermentation processes and enzymes in the production contribute to this effort. Equally important role to the quality of their wine plays the low productivity per stremma (550-600Kg).

    The Zafeirakis family is involved with the viticulture in the area of Tyrnavos for more than 100 years.

    Christos Zafeirakis, the forth in the line who continues the family tradition, takes the family business to the next level by bottling the first wine from his private vineyards in 2005.

    After he completed his studies in Oenology (Athens, 1996-2000) he decided that his desire was to enrich his knowledge and expand his experience. Thus, he continued his academic carrier at the University of Milan (Italy, 2003- 2004) where he undertook a master’s degree in Oenology (MSc).

    Soon after he returned to Greece he followed his father’s footsteps with main goal the production of high quality wines from grapes of organic farming.

    Meanwhile, his passion for the art of high quality wines drove him to many famous wineries at Piemonte, Alto Adige and Tuscany (in 2002, 2003 and 2004 equivalent) where he had the chance to gain valuable lessons and enhance his working experience.

    Finally, it is worth mentioning that the last ten years new kinds of grape were adopted such as Syrah, Merlot, Sangiovese, Chardonnay, Malagouzia etc. Moreover, it is crucial the attempt to revive local varieties one of which is "Limniona", which was first produced at November of 2008.

    A picturesque Mediterranean nation with a rich wine culture dating back to ancient times, Greece has so much more to offer than just retsina. Between the mainland and the country’s many islands, a wealth of wine styles exists, made mostly from Greece’s plentiful indigenous varieties. After centuries of adversity after Ottoman rule, the modern wine industry took off in the late 20th century with an influx of newly trained winemakers and investments in winemaking technology.

    The climate—generally hot Mediterranean—can vary a bit with latitude and elevation, and is mostly moderated by cool maritime breezes. Drought can be an issue during the long, dry summers, sometimes necessitating irrigation.

    Over 300 indigenous grapes have been identified throughout Greece, and though not all of them are suitable for wine production, future decades will likely see a significant revival and refinement of many of these native varieties. Assyrtiko, the crisp, saline variety of the island of Santorini, is one of the most important and popular white varieties, alongside Roditis, Robola, Moschofilero, and Malagousia. Muscat is also widely grown for both sweet and dry wines. Prominent red varieties include full-bodied and fruity Agiorghitiko, native to Nemea; Macedonia’s savory, tannic Xinomavro; and Mavrodaphne, used commonly to produce a Port-like fortified wine in the Peloponnese.

    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it’s grown and how it’s made. In Burgundy, Chardonnay produces some of the finest white wines in the world, typically tending towards minimal intervention in the winery and at its best resulting in remarkable longevity. This grape is popular throughout the world, but perhaps its second most important home is in California, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia, South America, South Africa, and New Zealand are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay’s flavors tend towards grapefruit, green apple, minerals, and white stone fruit, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of fig, melon, and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut, and spice (as well as texture), while malolactic fermentation can impart soft, buttery acidity.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with simple seafood, light chicken dishes, and salads. Richer Chardonnays marry well with cream or oil-based sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. These Old-World style wines have been dubbed the “New California Chardonnays,” and anyone who claims they do not like Chardonnay should give them a try.

    WLD1920055_2015 Item# 192403