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Domaine Jules Desjourneys Moulin-a-Vent 2009

Gamay from Beaujolais, Burgundy, France
  • RP92
0% ABV
  • RP92
  • RP91
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Winemaker Notes

The wines remain in barrel for 24 months and are absolutely, even unapologetically, built to age and age they must as these are most non light and fruity examples of Beaujolais. Think serious, concentrated and teeth coating with extremely firm but ripe tannins and you have the essence of these remarkable wines. Note that the corks are not only impressively long but all of them are meticulously stamped with the pertinent information... this will come together with bottle age as the underlying material is undeniably magnificent and implicit. Do not buy these wines searching for instant gratification because they are wines that definitely demand extended cellaring.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 92
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Grenadine and blackberry are underlain by roasted red meat savor as well as by dense, firm, even slightly edgy tannins in the Desjourneys 2009 Moulin-a-Vent, which I tasted in its final assemblage. I’m at a loss to locate all of the complexities I earlier discerned in the individual lots of Michelons and Chassignol that were incorporated, but the nut oils, cocoa powder, and crushed stone that add to this blend’s finishing savor help this blend testify to some of the excitement I recorded in my issue 190 barrel tastings. I suspect that it needs time to settle-down – though it has been bottled since I recorded this most recent note – and for its tannin to more completely integrate. But make no mistake: this is a long, strong performer even by the exceedingly high standards of its vintage and the even higher standards already established at Domaine Jules Desjourneys. Plan on revisiting it – as I shall – a year from now and tentatively on following it for 6-8 years.
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Domaine Jules Desjourneys

Domaine Jules Desjourneys

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Domaine Jules Desjourneys, Beaujolais, Burgundy, France
Fabien Duperray has been distributing some of the finest estates of burgundy in France for over 25 years, but until 2007 he had no vineyards of his own. He finally had the opportunity to acquire some small parcels of very old vines in Fleurie and Moulin-a-Vent in some truly special terroirs, and the results are nothing short of stunning. Fabien tends to every detail in the process with excrutiating precision. From his biodynamically farmed vines, to the hand pulling of weeds, the custom made barrels, the long elevage of 3 years, right down to the finest corks one can buy, the quality here at every turn is more akin to the most famous estates in the Cote d'Or. The wines are very limited but once tasted, you will understand what led David Schildknecht to write upon tasting the Desjourneys wines for the first time " The big story is some of the most remarkable Beaujolais wines of my experience, and perhaps ever rendered."

Beaujolais

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The bucolic region often identified as the southern part of Burgundy, Beaujolais actually doesn’t have a whole lot in common with the rest of the region in terms of climate, soil types and grape varieties. Beaujolais achieves its own identity with variations on style of one grape, Gamay.

Gamay was actually grown throughout all of Burgundy until 1395 when the Duke of Burgundy banished it south, making room for Pinot noir to inhabit all of the “superior” hillsides of Burgundy proper. This was good news for Gamay as it produces a much better wine in the granitic soils of Beaujolais, compared with the limestone escarpments of the Côte d’Or.

Four styles of Beaujolais exist though most is sold under the basic Beaujolais appellation. The simplest, and one that has regrettably given the region a subpar reputation, is Beaujolais Nouveau. This is the wine that is made using carbonic maceration (a quick fermentation that results in sweet aromas) and is released on the third Thursday of November in the same year as harvest. It's meant to drink young and is flirty, fruity and fun. The rest of Beaujolais is where the serious wines are found. Beaujolais-Villages, which must come from the hilly northern part of the region, offer reasonable values with some gems among them. The superior section are the cru vineyards coming from ten distinct communes: St-Amour, Juliénas, Chénas, Moulin-à-Vent, Fleurie, Chiroubles, Morgon, Regnié, Brouilly, and Côte de Brouilly. Any cru Beajolais will have its commune name prominent on the label.

Delightfully playful, yet at its best capable of impressive gravitas, Gamay is responsible for juicy, berry-packed wines from Beaujolais and parts of the Loire Valley. While it has received some criticism for its role in Beaujolais Nouveau—a decidedly young, charming and fruit-driven wine—the Gamay grape is very capable of producing serious wines. The variety is also widely planted in Savoie, Valle d'Aosta and Switzerland, and has recently found success on a small but growing scale in Oregon.

In the Glass

In its simplest form as Beaujolais Nouveau, a wine released just a couple of months after harvest, Gamay is fresh and full of cranberry and cherry candy flavors. But Gamay is capable of much more. The region of Beaujolais is divided into Villages and Crus, where granite-rich soils and conditions are perfect for Gamay. The Villages and Crus wines, given more time on the vine and in the winery, are capable of improving with age and offer dark blackberry or ripe cherry flavors with enticing aromas of baking spice, violets and dark wet earth.

Perfect Pairings

Gamay is delicious on its own; the simpler bottling can even benefit from a light chill before serving. It is the quintessential picnic red and goes well with simple charcuterie, country pâté and terrines. Gentle tannins and bright acidity make it a great option with Asian food, even dishes with a bit of spice. Gamay is also great with poultry, especially duck or Thanksgiving turkey with cranberry sauce.

Sommelier Secret

Within Beaujolais, there are ten different Crus, or highly ranked grape-growing communes. Each one has its own distinct personality—Fleurie is delicate and floral, Côte de Brouilly is concentrated and elegant and Morgon is serious, structured, and age-worthy, capable of rivaling some red Burgundies.

SPRDNJDMV09C_2009 Item# 133448