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Domaine Jean Grivot Richebourg Grand Cru 2011

Pinot Noir from Flagey-Echezeaux, Cote de Nuits, Cote d'Or, Burgundy, France
  • RP97
  • BH95
0% ABV
  • RP98
  • V98
  • BH96
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Winemaker Notes

Critical Acclaim

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RP 97
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Tasted blind at the Burgundy 2011 horizontal tasting in Beaune. The Richebourg 2011 from Etienne Grivot has a splendid bouquet with ripe, delineated raspberry, wild strawberry and red plum scents that are suffused with fine minerality. This just gets more and more complex in the glass. The palate is well balanced with fine tannins, crisp acidity and vibrant raspberry and cranberry fruit. It is nicely structured, which at the moment lends it a more masculine personality, but everything here is in its right place and there is precision all the way to the precise and tensile finish. Which 2011 Burgundy got the highest average score out of 250 tasted blind? This one.
BH 95
Burghound.com
This is quite floral though the nose is cool and very restrained and only aggressive swirling liberates a broad array of spice, black fruit liqueur and red currant aromas. The mineral-inflected large-scaled and muscular flavors possess a suave mouth feel on the driving, intense and gorgeously well-balanced finish that just goes on and on. This is very classy juice though note that it is not a forward 2011 and will require plenty of time.
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Domaine Jean Grivot

Domaine Jean Grivot

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Domaine Jean Grivot, Flagey-Echezeaux, Cote de Nuits, Cote d'Or, Burgundy, France
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The Grivots originally came from the Jura, but established themselves in Burgundy at the time of the French revolution. They first settled in Nuits-St.-Georges, later moving into Vosne-Romanée. While Burgundian tradition concentrates primarily on vineyards and viticulture, the Grivot family realized quite early on that oenology was equally important in producing fine wines, and Gaston Grivot was among the first growers to earn an oenology degree from the University of Dijon in the 1920's.

Jean Grivot, Gaston's son, also studied at the University of Dijon. His marriage into the Jayer family (for whom Grivot also consults and produces wines) consolidated family holdings; vineyards in Chambolle, Vosne-Romanée, Les Rouges and Echézeaux were added through inheritance. A parcel of Richebourg was acquired in 1984 from the Vienot estate. Etienne Grivot, the family's youngest vintner, now runs this remarkable estate. He has been praised as one of Burgundy's most innovative new talents.

Etienne Grivot believes in dense planting for small crops, with a continuing emphasis on full, rich Pinot Noir fruit. He strives to make ripe wines with a complete, well-rounded bouquet. Grivot formerly employed the controversial oenologist Guy Accad. While Etienne learned a great deal from the Accad experience, he now practices gentle and non-intrusive winemaking.

Flagey-Echezeaux

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Claiming the two famous Grand Crus, Echezeaux and Grands Echezeaux, the identity of this village, Flagey-Echezeaux, rides predominantly on the glory of those two crus. All of the village or Premier Cru status vineyards in Flagey-Echezeaux market themselves under the name of their neighbor, Vosne-Romanée.

Echezeaux Pinot noir tends be light, bright and full of finesse, whereas those of Grands Echezeaux typically have more heft and complexity.

Pinot Noir

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One of the most finicky yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is a labor of love for many. However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. In fact, it is the only red variety permitted in Burgundy. Highly reflective of its terroir, Pinot Noir prefers calcareous soils and a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality and demands a lot of attention in the vineyard and winery. It retains even more glory as an important component of Champagne as well as on its own in France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions. This sensational grape enjoys immense international success, most notably growing in Oregon, California and New Zealand with smaller amounts in Chile, Germany (as Spätburgunder) and Italy (as Pinot Nero).

In the Glass

Pinot Noir is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry and cherry with some heftier styles delving into the red or purple plum and in the other direction, red or orange citrus. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and a lively acidity. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount) it can develop hauntingly alluring characteristics of fresh earth, savory spice, dried fruit and truffles.

Perfect Pairings

Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon and tuna but its mild mannered tannins give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry: chicken, quail and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, Pinot noir has proven it isn’t afraid of beef. California examples work splendidly well with barbecue and Pinot Noir is also vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

Sommelier Secret

For administrative purposes, the region of Beaujolais is often included in Burgundy. But it is extremely different in terms of topography, soil and climate, and the important red grape here is ultimately Gamay. Truth be told, there is a tiny amount of Gamay sprinkled around the outlying parts of Burgundy (mainly in Maconnais) but it isn’t allowed with any great significance and certainly not in any Villages or Cru level wines.

SWS352334_2011 Item# 165678