Domaine de Triennes St.-Auguste 2010 Front Label
Domaine de Triennes St.-Auguste 2010 Front Label

Domaine de Triennes St.-Auguste 2010

  • WS90
750ML / 13.5% ABV
Other Vintages
  • WS89
All Vintages
Regular price
Currently Unavailable $14.99
Try the
20
14 99
Save $5.01 (25%)
0
Limit Reached
MyWine Share
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Ships Wed, Feb 2
Limit 0 per customer
Sold in increments of 0
0.0 0 Ratings
Have you tried this? Rate it now
(256 characters remaining)

0.0 0 Ratings
750ML / 13.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

#81 Wine Spectator Top 100 of 2014

Saint Auguste is a selection of the best cuvées of Syrah, Cabernet-Sauvignon and Merlot. The robe is a rich dark purple with bright ruby highlights. It offers alluring aromas of ripe black cherries, nutmeg and clove. It is full and concentrated and is a wine that can be enjoyed upon release and over the following ten to fifteen years.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 90
Wine Spectator
A dark, smoky version, with mulled plum and blackberry paste notes liberally lined with charcoal, dark olive and bay leaf flavors. Features a rugged feel through the toasted finish. Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Drink now through 2016.
View More
Domaine de Triennes

Domaine de Triennes

View all products
Domaine de Triennes, France
Domaine de Triennes  Winery Image
In 1989, two Burgundians, Jacques Seysses, founder of Domaine Dujac, and Aubert de Villaine, joined by their Parisian friend, Michel Macaux, went in search of new vineyards. Their attention turned to Provence where they were convinced the potential for great wines was enormous.

After a long search, they discovered the Domaine du Logis de Nans in the Var, east of Aix en Provence. They were immediately attracted to its gently sloping hillside with southern exposure. They saw its cool microclimate and its clay and limestone soils as ideal for viticulture.

The estate was renamed Triennes, a reference to Triennia, the festival for Bacchus, which was held every three years during Roman times. The prefix "Tri" serving as a reminder of the three original partners.

Image for Provencal Wine France content section
View all products

More than just a European vacation hotspot and rosé capital of the world, Provence, in southeastern France, is a coastal appellation producing interesting wines of all colors. The warm, breezy Mediterranean climate is ideal for grape growing and the diverse terrain and soil types allow for a variety of wine styles within the region. Adjacent to the Rhône Valley, Provence shares some characteristics with this northwestern neighbor—namely, the fierce mistral wind and the plentiful wild herbs (such as rosemary, lavender, juniper and thyme) often referred to as garrigue. The largest appellation here is Côtes de Provence, followed by Coteaux d’Aix-en-Provence.

Provence is internationally acclaimed for dry, refreshing, pale-hued rosé wines, which make up the vast majority of the region’s production. These are typically blends, often dominated by Mourvèdre and supplemented by Grenache, Cinsault, Tibouren and other varieties.

A small amount of full-bodied, herbal white wine is made here—particularly from the Cassis appellation, of Clairette and Marsanne. Other white varieties used throughout Provence include Roussane, Sémillon, Vermentino (known locally as Rolle) and Ugni Blanc.

Perhaps the most interesting wines of the region, however, are the red wines of Bandol. Predominantly Mourvèdre, these are powerful, structured, and ageworthy wines with lush berry fruit and savory characteristics of earth and spice.

Image for Other Red Blends content section
View all products

With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

STC857754_2010 Item# 133083

Internet Explorer is no longer supported.
Please use a different browser like Edge, Chrome or Firefox to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to make the switch.
Enjoy better browsing and increased security.

Yes, Update Now

Search for ""

Processing Your Order...