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Corte Giara Chardonnay 2013

Chardonnay from Veneto, Italy
    13% ABV
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    Currently Unavailable $8.89
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    13% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Brilliant and intense straw yellow. The ripeness of the nobleBurgundy varietal comes through with an intense aroma of yellow fruit, particularly apple and pear, enlivened by a subtle but intriguing floral and citrus vein. Graceful and harmonious, itis striking for its clear-cut, pristine palate. It has considerable body, supported by a crisp acidity

    Critical Acclaim

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    Corte Giara

    Corte Giara

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    Corte Giara, Veneto, Italy
    Created in 1989 by the Allegrini family and a select group of grape growers in the renowned winemaking district of Valpolicella, Corte Giara is an innovative project aimed at delivering everyday wines that combine tradition with a modern, eclectic and international approach. Corte Giara wines are typically crisp, highly aromatic and easy to drink, aimed at wine enthusiasts looking for quality at an attractive price.

    The Allegrini family, owners of the acclaimed eponymous Allegrini winery, started the Corte Giara project with the intention of emphasizing Veneto's winemaking heritage — proving that this region can produce approachable and easy-to-understand wines without sacrificing quality or tradition. Corte Giara offers the traditional Veronese appellation wines like Valpolicella, Soave, Amarone, and Ripasso, as well as other varietal wines from the Veneto region.

    Producing every style of wine and with great success, the Veneto is one of the most multi-faceted wine regions of Italy.

    Veneto's appellation called Valpolicella (meaning “valley of cellars” in Italian) is a series of north to south valleys and is the source of the region’s best red wine with the same name. Valpolicella—the wine—is juicy, spicy, tart and packed full of red cherry flavors. Corvina makes up the backbone of the blend with Rondinella, Molinara, Croatina and others playing supporting roles. Amarone, a dry red, and Recioto, a sweet wine, follow the same blending patterns but are made from grapes left to dry for a few months before pressing. The drying process results in intense, full-bodied, heady and often, quite cerebral wines.

    Soave, based on the indigenous Garganega grape, is the famous white here—made ultra popular in the 1970s at a time when quantity was more important than quality. Today one can find great values on whites from Soave, making it a perfect choice as an everyday sipper! But the more recent local, increased focus on low yields and high quality winemaking in the original Soave zone, now called Soave Classico, gives the real gems of the area. A fine Soave Classico will exhibit a round palate full of flavors such as ripe pear, yellow peach, melon or orange zest and have smoky and floral aromas and a sapid, fresh, mineral-driven finish.

    Much of Italy’s Pinot grigio hails from the Veneto, where the crisp and refreshing style is easy to maintain; the ultra-popular sparkling wine, Prosecco, comes from here as well.

    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

    WBO30101727_2013 Item# 130450