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Consilience Petite Sirah 2002

Petite Sirah from Central Coast, California
    0% ABV
    • RP91
    • WE90
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    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

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    Consilience

    Consilience

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    Consilience, Central Coast, California
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    Consilience was founded in 1999 when after years of planning the aspirations of two couples became a small reality. There of course is a long story, but the short of it began when winemaker Brett Escalera, his wife Monica, and the two of us, Tom and Jodie Daughters all met back in 1990 with many common values and interests. Wine and the lifestyle surrounding it were of particular interest to us, and after years of planning, education and good old fashioned perseverance Consilience started with a small production of 1997 Syrah from Santa Barbara County.

    Our production has grown, but we remain a small producer of premium wines loosely focused around the typical Rhone varietals. It all starts with the grapes, and we have been fortunate to establish relationships with some of the best vineyards and growers around Santa Barbara County, from whom we purchase most of our fruit. This has been pivotal in our quest to reliably produce the big, intense wines that have defined our style.

    Central Coast

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    The largest and perhaps most varied of California’s wine-growing regions, the Central Coast produces a good majority of the state's wine. This vast district stretches from San Francisco all the way to Santa Barbara along the coast, and reaches inland nearly all the way to the Central Valley.

    Encompassing an extremely diverse array of climates, soil types and wine styles, it contains many smaller sub-AVAs, including San Francisco Bay, Monterey, the Santa Cruz Mountains, Paso Robles, Edna Valley, Santa Ynez Valley and Santa Maria Valley.

    While the region could probably support almost any major grape varietiy, it is famous for a few. Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon and Zinfandel are among the major ones. The Central Coast is home to many of the state's small, artisanal wineries crafting unique, high-quality wines, as well as larger producers also making exceptional wines.

    Petite Sirah

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    With its deep color, rich texture, firm tannins and bold flavors, there is nothing petite about Petite Sirah. The variety, originally known as Durif in the Rhône, took on its more popular moniker when it was imported to California from France in 1884. Despite its origins, it has since become known as a quintessentially Californian grape, commonly utilized as a blending partner for softer Zinfandel and other varieties, but also finds success as a single varietal wine. It thrives in warmer spots, such as Lodi, Sonoma and Napa counties.

    In the Glass

    Petite Sirah wines are typically deep, dark, rich and inky with concentrated flavors of blueberry, plum, blackberry, black pepper, sweet baking spice, leather, cigar box and chewy, chocolaty tannins.

    Perfect Pairings

    Petite Sirah’s full body and bold fruit make it an ideal match for barbecue, especially brisket with a slightly sweet sauce or other rich meat dishes. The variety’s heavy tannins call for protein-rich and strong flavors that can stand up to the wine.

    Sommelier Secret

    Don’t get Petite Sirah confused with Syrah—it is not, as the name might seem to imply, a smaller version of Syrah. It is, however, the offspring of Syrah (crossed with an obscure French variety called Peloursin), so the two grapes do share some genetic characteristics despite being completely distinct.

    WWH31D32P92_2002 Item# 83195