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Chateau Lusseau 2004

Bordeaux Red Blends from St. Emilion, Bordeaux, France
  • RP89
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Winemaker Notes

You will appreciate the subtle blending of typical grape varieties from Merlot (50%), to Cabernet Sauvignon (40%), accentuated by Cabernet Franc (5%) and Malbec (5%).

This high quality wine, aged in oak barrels for 12 to 14 months, will delight you by the harmony of its black fruit aromas and its subtle wood flavors.

You will love it either daily or for special occasions.

Critical Acclaim

RP 89
The Wine Advocate

A small garagiste estate owned by the cellarmaster for Gerard Perse’s Pavie and other estates, Lusseau is always among the most sensual and silky-textured St.-Emilions. While the 2004 is not as concentrated as the 2005, it offers loads of smoky kirsch liqueur and sexy blacker fruits, low acidity, and a lush, hedonistic style. Drink it over the next 6-7 years.

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Chateau Lusseau

Chateau Lusseau

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Chateau Lusseau, , France - Bordeaux
Chateau Lusseau
The day my daughter told me she wanted to run the vineyard, I was not really carried away. A woman evolving in this male-chauvinist environment…. It sounded like a great task. Doing her way, she forsook her lawyer position in order to get a diploma in viticulture at the Lycée agricole of Blanquefort. Eventually, she achieved her first vintage in 2000. After 6 years managing the property, she has been able to mix the exactness of her university background, the family passion for the good wine and her female intuition to turn the Château Lusseau into a great new name of the “Graves de Bordeaux"

One of the most iconic regions of Italy for wine, scenery, and history, Tuscany is the world’s most important outpost for the Sangiovese grape. Ranging in style from fruity and simply to complex and age-worthy, as well as in price from budget-friendly to ultra-premium, Sangiovese makes up a significant percentage of plantings here, with the white Trebbiano Toscano trailing far behind. Within Tuscany, many esteemed wines are produced in their respective sub-zones, including Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino, Bolgheri, and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. The climate is Mediterranean and the topography consists mostly of picturesque rolling hills, with the hillside locations hosting the best vines, as Sangiovese ripens most efficiently with maximum exposure to sunlight.

Sangiovese at its simplest, often carrying a regional designation of Chianti or just Italy, produces straightforward pizza-friendly wines with bright red fruit and not much more, but at its best it shows remarkable complexity. In top-quality Sangiovese-based wines, expressive notes of sour cherry, balsamic vinegar, dried herbs, leather, fresh earth, dried flowers, anise, tobacco smoke, and cured meat fill the glass. Brunello in particular is sensitive to vintage variation, performing best in years that are not too hot and not too cold. A more recent phenomenon as of the 1970s is the “Super Tuscan”—a wine made from international grape varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, or Syrah, often grown in Tuscany’s Bolgheri region, with or without Sangiovese. These tend to be big, bold, and modern in style, often with noticeable new oak, and sold at super-premium prices.

Pinot Gris/Grigio

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One grape variety with two very distinct personas, Pinot Gris in France is rich, round, and aromatic, while Pinot Grigio in Italy is simple, crisp, and refreshing. In Italy, Pinot Grigio is grown in the mountainous regions of Trentino, Friuli, and Alto Adige in the northeast. In France it reaches its apex in Alsace. Pinots both “Gris” and “Grigio” are produced successfully in Oregon's Willamette Valley as well as parts of California, and are widely planted throughout central and eastern Europe.

In the Glass

Pinot Gris is naturally low in acidity, so full ripeness is necessary to achieve and showcase its signature flavors and aromas of stone fruit, citrus, honeysuckle, pear, and almond skin. Alsatian styles are aromatic, richly textured and often relatively high in alcohol. As Pinot Grigio in Italy, the style is much more subdued, light, simple, and easy to drink.

Perfect Pairings

Alsace is renowned for its potent food–pork, foie gras, and charcuterie. With its viscous nature, Pinot Gris fits in harmoniously with these heavy hitters. Pinot Grigio, on the other hand, with its lean, crisp, citrusy freshness, works better with simple salads, a wide range of seafood, and subtle chicken dishes.

Sommelier Secret

Outside of France and Italy, the decision by the producer whether to label as “Gris” or “Grigio” serves as a strong indicator as to the style of wine in the bottle—the former will typically be a richer, more serious rendition while the latter will be bright, fresh, and fun.

VCFBWP_1027_04_2004 Item# 101770

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