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Chateau Lassegue 2009

  • RP90
  • WE90
750ML / 13.5% ABV
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  • WS90
  • RP91
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750ML / 13.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The large amount of very ripe Cabernet Sauvignon delivers fruit expression with good tannins. The Cabernet Franc brings a subtle freshness and fruit with notes of raspberry, red current, and cherry. The Merlot adds a deep color, richness and a round aspect with black cherry, cassis, and blackberry flavors. This wine will age nicely for the next 25 years but can also be enjoyed within the next 5 years.

Blend: 60% Merlot, 20% Cabernet Franc, and 20% Cabernet Sauvignon.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
RP 90
Its ferocious tannins still need some resolution, and the wine is definitely what the French call a “vin de garde,” needing probably 8-10 years of cellaring. It is certainly concentrated, dense purple in color, with notes of iron, crushed rocks, black currants, kirsch and toasty oak. This is a chancy wine given the history that tannins always outlast the fruit, but there is a lot here and I wouldn’t want to dismiss it, considering all the good stuff it appears to possess. From the St.-Emilion home of the late Jess Jackson’s ambitious wine program, this wine was made by his brilliant superstar winemaker Pierre Seillan, who actually is Bordelais. The question here is if he has built this wine up too much with extraction and power.
WE 90
Powerful and rich, this has sweet tannins that overlay a juicy blackberry-jelly flavor. It is sumptuous and opulent, squeezing out every bit of richness. It has weight, and its tannins offer a fine future.
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Chateau Lassegue

Chateau Lassegue

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Chateau Lassegue, France
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Nestled on the Côte de Saint-Émilion, Chateau Lassègue exemplifies remarkable winemaking passion with its unbridled quest to craft world class wines. With its striking 18th century chateau, perennially sun-drenched vineyards and diverse soils, Chateau Lassègue sits in a unique position of honoring its heritage while also moving into a new era of winemaking tradition. Guided by renowned vigneron Pierre Seillan, Chateau Lassègue combines the best of old-world principles and new world technique to produce extraordinary wines.

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St-Émilion

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Marked by its historic fortified village—perhaps the prettiest in all of Bordeaux, the St-Émilion appellation, along with its neighboring village of Pomerol, are leaders in quality on the Right Bank of Bordeaux. These Merlot-dominant red wines (complemented by various amounts of Cabernet Franc and/or Cabernet Sauvignon) remain some of the most admired and collected wines of the world.

St-Émilion has the longest history in wine production in Bordeaux—longer than the Left Bank—dating back to an 8th century monk named Saint Émilion who became a hermit in one of the many limestone caves scattered throughout the area.

Today St-Émilion is made up of hundreds of independent farmers dedicated to the same thing: growing Merlot and Cabernet Franc (and tiny amounts of Cabernet Sauvignon). While always roughly the same blend, the wines of St-Émilion vary considerably depending on the soil upon which they are grown—and the soils do vary considerably throughout the region.

The chateaux with the highest classification (Premier Grand Cru Classés) are on gravel-rich soils or steep, clay-limestone hillsides. There are only four given the highest rank, called Premier Grand Cru Classés A (Chateau Cheval Blanc, Ausone, Angélus, Pavie) and 14 are Premier Grand Cru Classés B. Much of the rest of the vineyards in the appellation are on flatter land where the soils are a mix of gravel, sand and alluvial matter.

Great wines from St-Émilion will be deep in color, and might have characteristics of blackberry liqueur, black raspberry, licorice, chocolate, grilled meat, earth or truffles. They will be bold, layered and lush.

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Bordeaux Blends

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One of the world’s most classic and popular styles of red wine, Bordeaux-inspired blends have spread from their homeland in France to nearly every corner of the New World, especially in California, Washington and Australia. Typically based on either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot and supported by Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, these are sometimes referred to in the US as “Meritage” blends. In Bordeaux itself, Cabernet Sauvignon dominates in wines from the Left Bank of the Gironde River, while the Right Bank focuses on Merlot. Often, blends from outside the region are classified as being inspired by one or the other.

In the Glass

Cabernet-based, Left-Bank-styled wines are typically more tannic and structured, while Merlot-based wines modeled after the Right Bank are softer and suppler. Cabernet Franc can add herbal notes, while Malbec and Petit Verdot contribute color and structure. Wines from Bordeaux lean towards a highly structured and earthy style whereas New World areas (as in the ones named above) tend to produce bold and fruit-forward blends. Either way, Bordeaux red blends generally have aromas and flavors of black currant, cedar, plum, graphite, and violet, with more red fruit flavors when Merlot makes up a high proportion of the blend.

Perfect Pairings

Since Bordeaux red blends are often quite structured and tannic, they pair best with hearty, flavorful and fatty meat dishes. Any type of steak makes for a classic pairing. Equally welcome with these wines would be beef brisket, pot roast, braised lamb or smoked duck.

Sommelier Secret

While the region of Bordeaux is limited to a select few approved grape varieties in specified percentages, the New World is free to experiment. Bordeaux blends in California may include equal amounts of Cabernet Franc and Malbec, for example. Occassionally a winemaker might add a small percentage of a non-Bordeaux variety, such as Syrah or Petite Sirah for a desired result.

SOU389062_2009 Item# 518807