Chateau La Tour Carnet  2014 Front Label
Chateau La Tour Carnet  2014 Front Label

Chateau La Tour Carnet 2014

  • WE93
  • JS93
  • TP91
  • RP91
  • WS90
750ML / 0% ABV
Other Vintages
  • WE94
  • D93
  • JS93
  • RP91
  • JD90
  • WS90
  • JS93
  • RP90
  • D90
  • WS90
  • RP90
  • RP93
  • JS92
  • WE92
  • WE92
  • RP92
  • JS90
  • RP91
  • RP91
  • WS90
  • CG90
  • WE94
  • RP90
  • CG90
  • WS90
  • WE91
  • RP90
  • RP90
All Vintages
Currently Unavailable $31.99
Try the
31 99
31 99
Save $0.00 (0%)
Ships Tue, Jan 28
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
0
Limit Reached
0.0 0 Ratings
My Wine Share
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Have you tried this? Rate it now
(256 characters remaining)

0.0 0 Ratings
750ML / 0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Blend: 68% Merlot, 30% Cabernet Sauvignon and 2% Petit Verdot

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WE 93
Wine Enthusiast
This wine shows a dense structure marked with concentrated tannins and black plum fruits. The wine is rich and full on the palate, with just the right amount of fresh acidity to give it a lift. Barrel Sample: 91-93
JS 93
James Suckling
Brilliant aromas of blackberries, fresh mushrooms and dried flowers. Black licorice as well. Full body, tight and silky with ripe tannins and a linear line to it. Wet earth and spices. Drink in 2020.
TP 91
Tasting Panel
Dark red cherries, plums, smoke, leather and cedar flesh out in the 2014 La Tour Carnet. The style is soft, succulent and open, with lovely overall depth and silky tannins that wrap around the jammy finish. There is lot to like in this tasty Haut-Médoc from Bernard Magrez and Consulting Winemaker Michel Rolland. Barrel Sample: 88-91 pts.
RP 91
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2014 La Tour Carnet was a wine that I tasted last year from bottle, so why not give it another whirl to remind readers of its quality. There is a lot going on aromatically with plenty of boisterous black cherry and raspberry fruit, maintaining that floral element that I discerned last year. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, perhaps the oak on this bottle a little more conspicuous than before, but that will be subsumed with two or three years in bottle.
WS 90
Wine Spectator
Fresh, with a beam of cherry and black currant fruit, backed by modest tobacco and warm stone notes. The toast is a bit obvious through the finish, but this has good range. Barrel Sample: 87-90
View More
Chateau La Tour Carnet

Chateau La Tour Carnet

View all products
Chateau La Tour Carnet, France
Chateau La Tour Carnet Winery Video
The origins of La Tour Carnet lie in the Middle Ages, although the exact details are lost in the mists of time. Initially named Chateau de Saint-Laurent, some parts of the building, specifically the round tower, date from the 11th Century. The fortress was inhabited as early as the 12th Century, by the English, and it constituted a valuable military asset when Bordeaux was under English rule. The seigneurie of St-Laurent at this time was held by the Foix family, who were closely allied to the English king. Nevertheless, the land eventually fell to French rule once again, to which the then incumbent Comte Jean de Foix refused to submit, a decision that would eventually cost him his life. He was defeated by le beau Dunois, a compatriot of Jeanne d'Arc, and the impressive castle was partly destroyed. Following these events the ruined property passed through the hands of a succession of owners, before coming to Thibault de Carmaing in the 16th Century and eventually to Charles de Leutken, a man of Swedish origin, two hundred years after that. It remained with his descendents, and at the time of the 1855 classification was under the direction of Angélique Raymond, the wife of Jean-Jacques Leutken, who extolled a vineyard which covered 52 hectares. The current owner is Bernard Magrez, who is the proprietor of a number of other Bordeaux estates, most notably Pape Clément in Pessac-Léognan and Fombrauge in Saint Émilion.
Image for Haut Medoc Wine content section
View all products

While it claims the same basic landscape as the Medoc—only every so slightly elevated above river level—the Haut Medoc is home to all of the magnificent chateaux of the Left Bank of Bordeaux, creating no lack of beautiful sites to see.

These chateaux, residing over the classed-growth cru in the villages of Margaux, Moulis, Listrac, St-Julien, Pauillac and St. Estephe are within the Haut Medoc appellation. Though within the confines of these villages, any classed-growth chateaux will most certainly claim village or cru status on their wine labels.

Interestingly, some classed-growth cru of the Haut Medoc fall outside of these more famous villages and can certainly be a source of some of the best values in Bordeaux. Deep in color, and concentrated in ripe fruit and tannins, these wines (typically Cabernet Sauvignon-based) often prove the same aging potential of the village classed-growths. Among these, the highest ranked chateaux are Chateau La Lagune and Chateau Cantemerle.

Image for Bordeaux Blends content section
View all products

One of the world’s most classic and popular styles of red wine, Bordeaux-inspired blends have spread from their homeland in France to nearly every corner of the New World, especially in California, Washington and Australia. Typically based on either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot and supported by Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, these are sometimes referred to in the US as “Meritage” blends. In Bordeaux itself, Cabernet Sauvignon dominates in wines from the Left Bank of the Gironde River, while the Right Bank focuses on Merlot. Often, blends from outside the region are classified as being inspired by one or the other.

Tasting Notes for Bordeaux Blends

Bordeaux Blends are dry, red wines and generally have aromas and flavors of black currant, black cherry plum, graphite, cedar and violet. Cabernet-based, Left-Bank-styled wines are typically more tannic and structured, while Merlot-based wines, modeled after the Right Bank, are softer and suppler. Cabernet Franc can add herbal notes, while Malbec and Petit Verdot contribute color and structure.

Perfect Food Pairings for Bordeaux Blends

Since Bordeaux red blends are often quite structured and tannic, they pair best with hearty, flavorful and fatty meat dishes. Any type of steak makes for a classic pairing. Equally welcome with these wines would be beef brisket, pot roast, braised lamb or smoked duck.

Sommelier Secrets for Bordeaux Blends

While the region of Bordeaux is limited to a select few approved grape varieties in specified percentages, the New World is free to experiment. Bordeaux blends in California may include equal amounts of Cabernet Franc and Malbec, for example. Occassionally a winemaker might add a small percentage of a non-Bordeaux variety, such as Syrah or Petite Sirah for a desired result.

JOBF142811_2014 Item# 142811

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now
Cheers to You!

New customers: $20 off $100+. Code NEW2020

New customers: $20 off $100+. Code NEW2020

There was an error redeeming your code.

*New customers only. One-time use per customer. Order must be placed by 1/31/2020. The $20 discount is given for a single order with a minimum of $100 excluding shipping and tax. Items with pricing ending in .97 are excluded and will not count toward the minimum required. Discount does not apply to corporate orders, gift certificates, StewardShip membership fees, select Champagne brands, Riedel glassware, fine and rare wine, 187ML splits, and all bottles 3.0 liters or larger. No other promotion codes, coupon codes or corporate discounts may be applied to order.

Search for ""

Processing Your Order...