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Chateau La Dauphine 2012

Bordeaux Red Blends from Fronsac, Bordeaux, France
  • WS90
  • JS90
15% ABV
  • WS93
  • JS91
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15% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The color is a deep crimson. Very fruity on the nose with notes of blackberry and blackcurrant marrying elegantly with cigar box aromas. Full-bodied and velvety on the palate. A seductive vintage.

Blend: 90% Merlot, 10% Cabernet Franc

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 90
Wine Spectator
Delivers pure cassis and damson plum aromas, with a sleek feel and a good mix of toast and violet notes on the finish. Tasted twice, with consistent notes.Barrel Sample: 87-90 Points
JS 90
James Suckling
Very pretty fruit with dark berries and plums. Medium-to-full body, with fine tannins and a fresh finish.Barrel Sample:89-90 Points
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Chateau La Dauphine

Chateau La Dauphine

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Chateau La Dauphine, Fronsac, Bordeaux, France
In 1709, J-F Proteau sold La Dauphine to the Olivier family. At the time, Jean Olivier was an advisor to the King and Chief Finances Clerk for Guyenne. La Dauphine remained in the same family for almost three centuries.

The château was built between 1744 and 1750 by Jean-Baptiste de Richon, a lawyer at the Parliament of Paris, and a Civil and Criminal Judge in the Duchy of Fronsac. Shortly after its construction, Maria Josepha of Saxony, the Dauphine of France, wife of Louis-Ferdinand de France (the Dauphin, son of Louis XV), and mother of several of the last Kings of France (including Louis XVI) stayed at the château for a few days. This event contributed to the property’s reputation.

In 1985, François-Régis Marcetteau de Brem, the last descendant of the Olivier family, sold La Dauphine to the Moueix family of Libourne (who also own Petrus, Château Trotanoy and Magdeleine). In 2000, Jean Halley (a former director and co-founder of the Promodes group) acquired Château de La Dauphine. Jean Halley, who died in 2011, and his son, Guillaume, undertook major investments to enhance the expression of the terroir and further develop the property’s reputation.

Home of the very first remarkable Right Bank wines, dating back to the 1730s, Fronsac and Canon-Fronsac actually retained more fame than Pomerol well into the 19th century. Today these wines represent some of Bordeaux’s best hidden gems.

Fronsac is a very small region at an unusually high elevation compared to other Bordeaux appellations. Its vineyards unroll along the oak-dotted hills bordering the river’s edge, making it perhaps Bordeaux’s prettiest and most majestic countryside.

Merlot covers 60% of the vineyard acreage; the rest of the vines are Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon. The Fronsac and Canon-Fronsac appellations are limited to the higher land where soils are predominantly limestone and sandstone. Lower vineyards along the Dordogne River mainly qualify for Bordeaux AOC status

The best Fronsac are deeply concentrated in ripe red and black berry; they have a solid mineral backbone and are rich and plush on the finish.

Bordeaux Blends

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One of the world’s most classic and popular styles of red wine, Bordeaux-inspired blends have spread from their homeland in France to nearly every corner of the New World, especially in California, Washington and Australia. Typically based on either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot and supported by Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, these are sometimes referred to in the US as “Meritage” blends. In Bordeaux itself, Cabernet Sauvignon dominates in wines from the Left Bank of the Gironde River, while the Right Bank focuses on Merlot. Often, blends from outside the region are classified as being inspired by one or the other.

In the Glass

Cabernet-based, Left-Bank-styled wines are typically more tannic and structured, while Merlot-based wines modeled after the Right Bank are softer and suppler. Cabernet Franc can add herbal notes, while Malbec and Petit Verdot contribute color and structure. Wines from Bordeaux lean towards a highly structured and earthy style whereas New World areas (as in the ones named above) tend to produce bold and fruit-forward blends. Either way, Bordeaux red blends generally have aromas and flavors of black currant, cedar, plum, graphite, and violet, with more red fruit flavors when Merlot makes up a high proportion of the blend.

Perfect Pairings

Since Bordeaux red blends are often quite structured and tannic, they pair best with hearty, flavorful and fatty meat dishes. Any type of steak makes for a classic pairing. Equally welcome with these wines would be beef brisket, pot roast, braised lamb or smoked duck.

Sommelier Secret

While the region of Bordeaux is limited to a select few approved grape varieties in specified percentages, the New World is free to experiment. Bordeaux blends in California may include equal amounts of Cabernet Franc and Malbec, for example. Occassionally a winemaker might add a small percentage of a non-Bordeaux variety, such as Syrah or Petite Sirah for a desired result.

BND145747_2012 Item# 145747