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Chateau de la Selve Maguelonne Rose 2012

Rosé from Rhone, France
    0% ABV
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    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Pale salmon pink color with a deep shine. Delicate, aromatic and fruity nose, with red and white fruit aromas and a flowery note. It has a mineral body with a great freshness and an elegant delicacy.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Chateau de la Selve

    Chateau de la Selve

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    Chateau de la Selve, Rhone, France
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    The Chateau de la Selve was a castle on the frontier of the Empire and then of the Kingdom of France. It then became the hunting lodge of the famous Dukes de Joyeuse, before being transformed into a farm after a few centuries. Built during the 13th century, it has the typical architecture of many of the castles of the Bas-Vivarais. Located on the banks of the Chassezac, the main Ardèche's tributary, it benefits from a unique and protected environment.

    In 1990, this magnificent house became the property of Jean-Régis and Magdeleine Chazallon. The Château thus became a family abode. Wine is grown with respect for the environment and the goal of letting the soil express itself. In this perspective, they are always looking for better areas for vines to grow and have adopted biodynamic principals.

    A long and narrow valley producing flavorful red, white, and rosé wines, the Rhône is bisected by the river of the same name and split into two distinct sub-regions—north and south. While a handful of grape varieties span the entire length of the valley, there are significant differences between the two zones in climate and geography as well as the style and quantity of wines produced. The Northern Rhône, with its continental climate and steep hillside vineyards, is responsible for a mere 5% or less of the greater region’s total output. The Southern Rhône has a much more Mediterranean climate, the aggressive, chilly Mistral wind and plentiful fragrant wild herbs known collectively as ‘garrigue.’

    In the Northern Rhône, the only permitted red variety is Syrah, which in the appellations of St.-Joseph, Hermitage, Cornas and Côte-Rôtie, it produces velvety black-fruit driven, savory, peppery red wines often with telltale notes of olive, game and smoke. Full-bodied, perfumed whites are made from Viognier in Condrieu and Château-Grillet, while elsewhere only Marsanne and Roussanne are used, with the former providing body and texture and the latter lending nervy acidity. The wines of the Southern Rhône are typically blends, with the reds often based on Grenache and balanced by Syrah, Mourvèdre, and an assortment of other varieties. All three northern white varieties are used here, as well as Grenache Blanc, Clairette, Bourbelenc and more. The best known sub-regions of the Southern Rhône are the reliable, wallet-friendly Côtes du Rhône and the esteemed Châteauneuf-du-Pape. Others include Gigondas, Vacqueyras and the rosé-only appellation Tavel.

    Rosé Wine

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    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    VCN610712_2012 Item# 123808