Celler del Roure Vermell 2019  Front Label
Celler del Roure Vermell 2019  Front LabelCeller del Roure Vermell 2019  Front Bottle Shot

Celler del Roure Vermell 2019

  • RP91
750ML / 12.5% ABV
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3.7 6 Ratings
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3.7 6 Ratings
750ML / 12.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Vermell is a blend featuring 70% Garnacha Tintorera – a 19th-century, French crossing of Garnacha and Aramon Noir that was widely planted after phylloxera. It was initially prized for its dark color (its flesh is red as well as its skins) and productive yields. It gradually found its way to Iberia with significant plantings in Galicia, La Mancha, Valencia, and Southern Portugal. Vermell also includes 30% younger vine Mandó. Hand harvested, destemmed and fermented by natural yeasts in stainless steel tanks and stone lagars, then aged in amphorae, Vermell showcases the typical bright, red-berried, and herbal flavors of Garnacha Tintorera without being overripe, overbearing, or overloaded with oak. It is an excellent introduction to the new “old style” of wines being made at Celler del Roure.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 91
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
An entry-level red from local varieties, the 2019 Vermell is a blend of 70% Garnacha Tintorera and 30% Mandó from vines planted in 1996. It fermented with part of full clusters in stainless steel with indigenous yeasts and matured in 2,600-liter clay tinajas (amphorae) for four months. The vinification is very light, closer to a rosé than a red. This is very primary, juicy like biting into a ripe bunch of grapes. The palate is still mineral and serious, with a dry, chalky finish, quite unusual at this price point. It has a little more structure and oomph than the 2018. Straightforward and easy to drink.
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Celler del Roure

Celler del Roure

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Celler del Roure, Spain
Celler del Roure  Winery Image
Everything old is new again. If you had visited Celler del Roure when it was initially created in 1995, you would have been treated to a modern, minimalist and spotless cellar with assorted stainless steel tanks and new French oak barrels. Such is not the case today. After touring the current technology in viniculture, you would be taken on a tour of the ancient property that includes an old olive press, various outbuildings and a subterranean cellar dug into the bedrock below the estate. This cellar afforded a glimpse of the winemaking practices of centuries ago. The winding halls of the cellar are lined by dozens of amphorae embedded into the earth with individual stone lids. Many have been joined by stone channels carved into the rock, serving as the most rudimentary form of gravity flow. Some amphorae have cracked over the years, but a surprising number remain in perfect condition.

Such a complete and well-preserved artifact of viniculture would have remained an intellectual curiosity for most people, but Pablo Calatayud founded Celler del Roure with the intention of exploring both how wines were made centuries ago, as well as how they would have tasted. Such an endeavor makes complete sense once you meet Pablo and understand his connection with the history of the Valencian region surrounding the village of Moixent. As a proponent of the indigenous varieties of the area, such as Mando and Verdil, how could he also not champion indigenous viniculture? While there are still "modern" wines made at Celler del Roure, the majority of cuvees age in amphorae in the ancient cellar.

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The Valencia DO wine region is a non-contiguous appellation, with four distinct subzones, surrounding the area beyond Valencia’s capital city. Winemaking in the northern part of this region is dominated by old growing areas surrounding the city. The region was established in 1957.

Historically, bulk wine has been the focal point of the region and cooperatives still handle 85% of total production today. However, winemakers are trying to steadily move away from this and focus more on producing quality wine thanks to a growing group of local innovative winemakers. More importance is being placed on older vines of indigenous (or historic) varieties planted at higher altitudes, which range from 820 - 3,600 feet.

There is growing excitement about the wines being produced from black grapes such as Monastrell, as well as late-ripening white grapes such as Merseguera. The most planted grape, Moscatel de Alejandría, has its own subzone centered around the production of sweet, fortified liqueur wines, called locally Mistela de Moscatel. The region's reds, rosés and whites actually all include dessert wines, each with their own wine-making traditions.

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

How to Serve Red Wine

A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines.

How Long Does Red Wine Last?

Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

RAE390055_2019 Item# 895830

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