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Cavit Pinot Noir 2004

Pinot Noir from Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy
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    Winemaker Notes

    Color: Intense red characterized by slight orange-terracotta highlights which develop with prolong aging.

    Taste: Delicate fruit taste is redolent of berries with cherry notes. Good body with a pleasing finish.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Cavit
    Cavit, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy
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    Founded in 1957, Cavit has earned an international reputation as an innovative leader in Trentino winemaking. Today it is responsible for approximately 70% of this northern Italian province's entire wine production.

    The company is based on a partnership between 5,000 member growers, organized into 14 associated cellars located throughout Trentino in zones noted for the quality of their production. Grapes are crushed and vinified at each cellar and after selection sent to Cavit's central winery near Trento for finishing, bottling and aging.

    Cavit is a capital example of cooperation and size on a human scale. Trentino winemaking families are able to tap into a pool of resources and attain levels of quality that might otherwise lie beyond their reach.

    Strength in numbers has also enabled Cavit to develop its own showcase hospitality and research center (which works closely with Italy's most prestigious school of viticultural research at nearby San Michele all'Adige), at the beautiful Maso Torresella, a former archbishop's castle on the shores of Lake Toblino.

    The rewards of cooperation between Cavit's growers are apparent at every level, not least among consumers, for whom Cavit produces consistently high quality, affordably priced premium wines that have captured literally hundreds of awards and medals to date and are in demand in over 20 countries worldwide.

    Trentino-Alto Adige

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    A mountainous northern Italian region heavily influenced by German culture, Trentino-Alto Adige is actually made up of two separate but similar regions: Alto Adige and Trentino. Trentino, the southern half, is primarily Italian-speaking and largely responsible for the production of large volumes of wine made from non-native grapes. There is a significant quantity of Chardonnay and Pinot Grigio produced here, and Merlot is common as well.

    The rugged terrain of German-speaking Alto Adige (also referred to as Südtirol) is more focused on smaller-scale viticulture, and greater value is placed on local varieties, though international varieties are widely planted as well. Sheltered by the Alps from harsh northerly winds, many of the best vineyards are planted at extreme altitude on steep slopes to increase sunlight exposure. Dominant red varieties include the bold, herbaceous Lagrein and delicate, strawberry-kissed Schiava, in addition to some Pinot Nero. The primary white grapes are Pinot Grigio, Gewürztraminer, Chardonnay, and Pinot Blanc, as well as smaller plantings of Sauvignon Blanc, Müller Thurgau, and others. These tend to be bright and refreshing with crisp acidity and just the right amount of texture. Some of the highest quality Pinot Grigio in Italy is made here.

    Pinot Noir

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    One of the most difficult yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is commonly referred to by winemakers as the “heartbreak grape.” However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. More reflective than most varieties of the land on which it is grown, Pinot Noir prefers a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality, and demands care in the vineyard and lots of attention in the winery. It is an important component of Champagne and the only variety permitted in red Burgundy. Pinot Noir enjoys immense popularity internationally, most notably in Oregon, California, and New Zealand.

    In the Glass

    Pinot Noir Is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry, and cherry. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and lively acidity. It ranges in body from very light to the heavier side of medium, typically landing somewhere in the middle—giving it extensive possibilities for food pairing. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount), it can develop hauntingly beautiful characteristics of fresh earth, autumn leaves, and truffles.

    Perfect Pairings

    Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon, ocean trout, and tuna. Its mild mannered tannins don’t fight with spicy food, and give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry—chicken, quail, and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, it can even match with heavier fare. Pinot Noir is also very vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

    Sommelier Secret

    Pinot Noir is dangerously drinkable, highly addictive, and has a bad habit of emptying the wallet. Look for affordable but still delicious examples from Germany (as Spätburgunder), Italy (as Pinot Nero), Chile, New Zealand, and France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions.

    WWI500603_2004 Item# 85174