Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now

New Customers Save $30 off $100+* with code SEPTNEW

New Customers Save $30* with code SEPTNEW

*New customers only. One-time use per customer. Order must be placed by 9/30/2018. The $30 discount is given for a single order with a minimum of $100 excluding shipping and tax. Items with pricing ending in .97 are excluded and will not count toward the minimum required. Discount does not apply to corporate orders, gift certificates, StewardShip membership fees, select Champagne brands, Riedel glassware, fine and rare wine, and all bottles 3.0 liters or larger. No other promotion codes, coupon codes or corporate discounts may be applied to order.

Due to state regulations, we cannot ship wine to California
Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wine

Castello di Luzzano Tasto di Seta Malvasia 2009

Malvasia from Italy
  • RP90
13% ABV
All Vintages
Currently Unavailable $15.99
Try the 2014 Vintage 17 99
19 99
15 99
Save $4.00 (20%)
Ships Mon, Oct 1
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
Add to Cart
1
Limit Reached
0.0 0 Ratings
Share
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Rate for better recommendations
(256 characters remaining)
Cancel Save

0.0 0 Ratings
13% ABV

Winemaker Notes

100% Malvasia di Candia.

Bright straw yellow. A very intense, aromatic, floral nose of acacia, cypress and mint. Balanced and soft on the characteristically fragrant palate, with excellent length. Excellent as an aperitif; well suited for risottos, dishes made with fresh pasta, egg and vegetable dishes, salami and white meats. Exceptional with fat-fleshed fish and seafood (such as crustaceans).

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
RP 90
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2009 Malvasia Tasto di Seta is round and beautiful in its jasmine, white peaches, tangerine and passion fruit. There is plenty of Malvasia character, but in 2009 the Tasto di Seta is almost tropical in its fruit. A long, polished close rounds things out in style. Anticipated maturity: 2010-2012.
View More
Castello di Luzzano

Castello di Luzzano

View all wine
Castello di Luzzano, Italy
Image of winery
The Luzzano and Romito have been in the family of Maria Giulia and her sister, Giovannella Fugazza for nearly a century. Documents citing the excellent wines of Luzzano have been found dating as far as the 12th century. The property straddles the border between Emilia and Lombardia an area known for the variety and quality of its wines, with one vineyard in the Colli Piacentini DOC and the other in the Oltrepo Pavese.

Archaeologists have found evidence that wines existed in this part of the region during the Roman Empire and were cultivated intensively to produce wine. Soils in the Piacentino part of the estate are sandy clay and marl. The Pavese produces distinctive premium wines with color, taste and aromas that have earned widespread acclaim. Research and experimentation with grafting and new varieties has enabled Luzzano to develop extremely successful clones, particularly with Barbera and Bonarda typical kind of the region.

Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture that is virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes are grown just about everywhere throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. The defining geographical feature of the country is the Apennine Mountain range, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south. The island of Sicily nearly grazes the toe of Italy’s boot, while Sardinia lies to the country’s west. Climate varies significantly throughout the country, with temperature being somewhat more dependent on elevation than latitude, though it is safe to generalize that the south is warmer. Much of the highest quality viticulture takes place on gently rolling, picturesque hillsides.

Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but their use is declining in popularity, especially as younger growers begun to take interest in rediscovering forgotten local specialties. Sangiovese is the most widely planted variety in the country, reaching its greatest potential in parts of Tuscany. Nebbiolo is the prized grape of Piedmont in the northwest, producing singular, complex and age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Montepulciano, Trebbiano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola, and of course, Pinot Grigio.

Malvasia

View all wine

Persistent jasmine aromas coupled with ripe tropical and stone fruit flavors are pervasive in many wines that call themselves Malvasia. Both grape and name are far-reaching. Over 20 different varieties grow throughout Italy, Spain, Greece and other countries.

But variations on the name itself are plentiful too. There are actually approximately 70 registered grapes with Malvasia as part of their name or listed as a synonym for Malvasia. Some think that the actual name, Malvasia, stems from the Italian mispronunciation of Monemvasia, a southern Greek port. The French call it Malvoisie, the British say Malmsey and the Germans call it Malvasier. In any case, Italy has more forms of Malvasia than any other country. Most popular are Malvasia Bianca di Candia from Lazio, Malvasia di Candia Aromatico, which is planted widely and the red-skinned Malvasia di Casorzo from Piedmont. The list goes on.

Mainly known as a white grape, wines made from some type of Malvasia are adored for their spicy, fruity and exotic floral aromas, coupled with an assortment of fruits on the plate and a fresh zippy finish, whether bone dry or carrying any sort of residual sugar.

HNYCLOTDS09C_2009 Item# 108881