Castello di Ama Haiku 2017  Front Label
Castello di Ama Haiku 2017  Front LabelCastello di Ama Haiku 2017  Front Bottle Shot

Castello di Ama Haiku 2017

  • RP94
  • V93
  • WS93
750ML / 13.5% ABV
Other Vintages
  • RP95
  • JS94
  • V95
  • RP95
  • JS94
  • WS93
  • JS93
  • RP92
  • JS92
  • RP92
  • WS91
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750ML / 13.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The 2017 Castello di Ama Haiku is an intense purple red color with ruby-red nuances. Fruity aromas (fruits of the forest, such as raspberry and blackcurrants), spicy (pepper, wild herbs and tobacco). Good attack with a clear identity of the grape varieties. The wine is intrinsically elegant and natural freshness evolving in a silky finish.

Blend: Sangiovese 50%, Cabernet Franc 25%, Merlot 25%

Critical Acclaim

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RP 94
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The Castello di Ama 2017 Haiku (a blend of Sangiovese with Cabernet Franc and Merlot in supporting roles) shows a rich and powerful center of gravity, all framed by lovely freshness and lots of rich fruit fiber. It sticks firmly to the palate with big fruit intensity, plum, blackberry, spice and cured tobacco. Haiku is a very unique wine within the context of Tuscany, and I'm not just referring to the unusual blend of grapes used here. This vintage offers darkness and a level of power that we don't usually associate with Tuscany. Yet, good context is given because the Sangiovese grape adds an authentic Tuscan touch and gives the wine a sense of place.
V 93
Vinous

The 2017 Haiku is a blend of Sangiovese, Merlot and Cabernet Franc. Succulent dark cherry, plum, mocha, spice, new leather and licorice all flesh out in a racy, forward Tuscan red that can be enjoyed with minimal cellaring. Time in bottle should bring out more aromatic nuance and overall complexity. Drinking window: 2021 - 2030.

WS 93
Wine Spectator

A lush mouthful of black currant and blackberry fruit is augmented by violet, rosemary and baking spices in this red, which is open and approachable, despite the dense, fine-grained tannins. Finishes long and fresh. Sangiovese, Cabernet Franc and Merlot. Drink now through 2032.

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Castello di Ama

Castello di Ama

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Castello di Ama, Italy
Castello di Ama Castello di Ama’s Bellavista Vineyards Winery Image
Ama is an old, fortified village situated near Radda and Gaiole in the heart of the Chianti Classico region. The Castello or Castle of Ama is surrounded by the beautiful Tuscan countryside and is near some of the original, noble families of the Chianti region. The meticulously cultivated vineyards are privy to optimal exposures and consist of fertile soils. Ama is a modern estate comprising 500 acres of land, 200 of which are vineyards. These vineyards are divided into five important parcels; San Lorenzo, Bellavista, La Casuccia, Bertinga and Montebuoni. In the 1970s, four families formed a partnership and purchased the property with the goal of producing world-class wines. Castello Di Ama is unique, employing its best Sangiovese to produce Chianti Classico, unlike many Tuscan producers who have chosen to blend their best Sangiovese into Vini da Tavola or Super Tuscans. In addition to the acclaimed Chianti Classico produced in each vintage, the crus of Bellavista and La Casuccia are produced only in outstanding vintages and in extremely limited quantity. These wines in their concentration, harmony and overall elegance represent the best expression of Sangiovese in Tuscany.
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Famous for its food-friendly, approachable red wines and their storied history, Chianti is perhaps the best-known wine region of Italy. This appellation within Tuscany has it all: sweeping views of rolling hills, endless vineyards, the warm Mediterranean sun, hearty cuisine and a rich artistic heritage. Chianti includes seven subzones: Chianti Colli Fiorentini, Rufina, Montalbano, Colli Senesi, Colline Pisane, Colli Aretini and Montespertoli, with area beyond whose wines can be labeled simply as Chianti.

However the best quality comes from Chianti Classico, in the heart of the Chianti zone, which is no longer a subzone of the region at all but has been recognized on its own since 1996. The Classico region today is delimited by the confines of the original Chianti zone protected since the 1700s.

Chianti wines are made primarily of Sangiovese, with other varieties comprising up to 25-30% of the blend. Generally, local varieties are used, including Canaiolo, Colorino and Mammolo, but international varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah are allowed as long as they are grown within the same zone.

Basic, value-driven Chianti wine is simple and fruit-forward and makes a great companion to any casual dinner. At its apex, Chianti is full bodied but with good acidity, firm tannins, and notes of tart red fruit, dried herbs, fennel, balsamic and tobacco. Chianti Riserva, typically the top bottling of a producer, can benefit handsomely from a decade or two of cellaring.

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

How to Serve Red Wine

A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines.

How Long Does Red Wine Last?

Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

SOU538418_2017 Item# 611369

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