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Bouchard Aine & Fils Grenache-Cinsault Rose 2013

Rosé from France
    0% ABV
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    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    This Grenache-Cinsault Rose is a salmon pink in color. The nose is fine, fruity and elegant with notes of red berries. On the palate, fruity and flavorful with notes of red berries and tropical fruit.

    Serve well chilled as an aperitif or as an accompaniment to grilledmeats, pizzas, salads, fish terrines, pasta dishes.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Bouchard Aine & Fils

    Bouchard Aine & Fils

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    Bouchard Aine & Fils, France
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    When Michel Bouchard founded his wine merchant business in Beaune in 1750 with his elder son, he wanted to settle in the heart of Burgundy and its vines. Being close to the vine-growers, he created a unique expertise in selection, wine making and aging with one mission:

    Always search for perfection in quality, authenticity in style and prestige in the name.

    For over two centuries, this has been the vision of the House of Bouchard Ainé & Fils.

    Nearly synonymous with fine wine and all things epicurean, France has a culture of wine production and consumption that is deeply rooted in tradition. Many of the world’s most beloved grape varieties originated here, as did the concept of “terroir”—soil type, elevation, slope angle and mesoclimate combine to produce resulting wines that convey a sense of place. Accordingly, most French wine is labeled by geographical location, rather than grape variety. So a general understaning of which grapes correspond to which regions can be helpful in navigating all of the types of French wine. Some of the greatest wine regions in the world are here, including Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Rhône, and Champagne, but each part of the country has its own specialties and strengths.

    Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, are the king and queen of Burgundy, producing elegant red and white wines with great acidity, the finest examples of which can age for decades. The same varieties, along with Pinot Meunier, are used in Champagne. Of comparable renown is Bordeaux, focused on bold, structured red wines made of blends of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc including sometimes a small amount of Petit Verdot or Malbec. The primary white varieties of Bordeaux are Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon. The Rhône Valley is responsible for monovarietal Syrah in the north, while the south specializes in Grenache blends; Rhône's main white variety is Viognier.

    Most of these grape varieties are planted throughout the country and beyond, extending their influence into other parts of Europe and New World appellations.

    Rosé Wine

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    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    LNI1BDGRPF313_2013 Item# 146737