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Borgo Scopeto Chianti Classico 2000

Chianti(JA) from Chianti Classico, Chianti, Tuscany, Italy
    0% ABV
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    Winemaker Notes

    A powerful, full-bodied wine, which has good depth and evident new oak character. It tastes of ripe berries, oak, and vanilla - delightful stuff!

    Critical Acclaim

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    Borgo Scopeto

    Borgo Scopeto

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    Borgo Scopeto, Chianti Classico, Chianti, Tuscany, Italy
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    Borgo Scarpeto is an old and well-established estate producer of Chianti Classico and is a true borgo - a hamlet with its own church, post office, town center and residences. Elizabetta Gnudi owns Borgo Scopeto, and she and winemaker Simone Giunti are responsible for all aspects of the production of Borgo Scopeto wines.

    The Chianti Classico of Borgo Scopeto comes from Castelnuovo Berardenga, which is the southern-most commune within the Chianti Classico zone. All vineyards at Borgo Scopeto are dry farmed from the day the vines are first planted.

    Chianti Classico

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    One of the first wine regions anywhere to be officially recognized and delimited, Chianti Classico is today what was originally defined simply as Chianti. Already identified by the early 18th century for its superiority, the official name of Chianti was proclaimed upon the area surrounding the townships of Castellina, Radda and Gaiole, just north of Siena, by Cosimo III, Grand Duke of Tuscany in an official decree in 1716.

    However, by the 1930s the Italian government’s Dalmasso commission added land to this historic zone in order to capitalize on the Chianti name. It wasn’t until 1996 that Chianti Classico became autonomous once again when the government granted a separate DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) to its borders. Ever since, Chianti Classico is therefore no longer a subzone of Chianti.

    Many Classicos are today made of 100% Sangiovese but can include up to 20% of other approved varieties grown within the Classico borders. The best Classicos will have a bright acidity, supple tannins and be full-bodied with plenty of ripe fruit (plums, black cherry, blackberry). Also common among the best Classicos are expressive notes of cedar, tobacco, dried herbs, fennel, balsamic or tobacco.

    Red Wine

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    Ranging in style from light and elegant to bold and structured, red wine is produced just about everywhere in the world where vines are planted. There are several dozen varieties that contribute to the majority of red wine production, some of the main of which are Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. These are grown throughout the world in addition to the many native varieties found in their respective regions. Red grapes tend to ripen better in warmer, sunnier climates—producing robust and concentrated wines—though some of the world’s most elegant red wines come from cooler regions where alcohol levels are kept at bay and natural acidity remains crisp and refreshing.

    Both red and white grapes have clear juice, but the color of red wine comes from the pigments in red grape skins. Along with pigments, also tannins and phenols (comnpunds responsible for the complex aromas and flavors in wine) are found in grape skins. When making red wine, the juice is left in contact with its skins, which allows all of these compund to be drawn out. Heat and alcohol generated by fermentation helps this process, called maceration, along. For a more deeply colored wine, the winemaker has several options in the cellar including increasing the fermentation temperature or prolonging the skin-contact period. The resulting shade of red can range from pale garnet to bright ruby to opaque purple.

    PBC2763746_2000 Item# 62605