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Borgo Magredo Pinot Noir 2010

Pinot Noir from Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy
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    Winemaker Notes

    In the glass, it's a nice red hue that's not particularly intense, as is typical of Pinot Nero. It gives off intense scents recalling small red berries, cherries and wild violets. The mouth will perceive the wine's good structure and it's easy on the palate thanks to its soft rotund nature. Well-balanced on all levels, it has good persistence and an excellent aromatic nature.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Borgo Magredo

    Borgo Magredo

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    Borgo Magredo, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy
    Two hundred and fifty hectares of vineyards, with a production capacity of one million bottles per year, two product lines with a total of sixteen wines capable of satisfying different tastes. This Estate is ideally equipped to implement state-of-the-art concepts and create enthusiasm for the successful marketing of appealing and competitively priced wines: the classic fresh white wines, the traditional red wines, and the single vineyard wines of the Le Braide vineyards.

    Borgo Magredo deploys the most modern equipment and technology in order to effectively transform its grapes into wines that please both the pocketbook and the palate. In particular, Borgo Magredo utilizes the technique of soft pressing of the grapes, computerized temperature controlled fermentation, and the bottling under sterilized conditions. In addition, it owns oak barrels for aging the wine before fining in bottles. The positive results confirm the technological choices that are made.

    Friuli-Venezia Giulia

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    The source of some of Italy’s best and most distinctive white wines, Friuli-Venezia Giulia is where Italian, Germanic and Slavic cultures converge. The styles of wines produced in this region of Italy's far north-east reflect this merging of cultures. Often shortened to just “Friuli,” the area is divided into many distinct subzones, including Friuli Grave, Colli Orientali del Friuli, Collio Goriziano and Carso. The flat valley of Friuli Grave is responsible for a large proportion of the region’s wine production, particularly the approachable Pinot grigio and the popular Prosecco. The best vineyard locations are often on hillsides, as in Colli Orientali del Friuli or Collio. In general, Friuli boasts an ideal climate for viticulture, with warm sunny days and chilly nights, which allow grapes to ripen slowly and evenly.

    In Colli Orientali, the specialty is crisp, flavorful white wine made from indigenous varieities like Friulano (formerly known as Tocai Friulano), Ribolla gialla and Malvasia Istriana.

    Red wines, though far less common here, can be quite good, especially when made from the deeply colored, rustic Refosco variety. In Collio Goriziano, which abutts Slovenia, many of the same varieties are planted. International varieties like Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Cabernet Franc are also common, but they tend to be Loire-like in style with herbaceous character and mellow tannins. Carso’s star grape is the red Teranno, notable for being rich in iron content and historically consumed for health purposes. It has an earthy, meaty profile and is often confused with the distinct variety Refosco.

    Pinot Noir

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    One of the most finicky yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is a labor of love for many. However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. In fact, it is the only red variety permitted in Burgundy. Highly reflective of its terroir, Pinot Noir prefers calcareous soils and a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality and demands a lot of attention in the vineyard and winery. It retains even more glory as an important component of Champagne as well as on its own in France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions. This sensational grape enjoys immense international success, most notably growing in Oregon, California and New Zealand with smaller amounts in Chile, Germany (as Spätburgunder) and Italy (as Pinot Nero).

    In the Glass

    Pinot Noir is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry and cherry with some heftier styles delving into the red or purple plum and in the other direction, red or orange citrus. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and a lively acidity. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount) it can develop hauntingly alluring characteristics of fresh earth, savory spice, dried fruit and truffles.

    Perfect Pairings

    Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon and tuna but its mild mannered tannins give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry: chicken, quail and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, Pinot noir has proven it isn’t afraid of beef. California examples work splendidly well with barbecue and Pinot Noir is also vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

    Sommelier Secret

    For administrative purposes, the region of Beaujolais is often included in Burgundy. But it is extremely different in terms of topography, soil and climate, and the important red grape here is ultimately Gamay, not Pinot noir. Truth be told, there is a tiny amount of Gamay sprinkled around the outlying parts of Burgundy (mainly in Maconnais) but it isn’t allowed with any great significance and certainly not in any Village or Cru level wines. So "red Burgundy" still necessarily refers to Pinot noir.

    PIN108134_2010 Item# 111134