Bollinger La Grande Annee Brut Rose 2005 Front Label
Bollinger La Grande Annee Brut Rose 2005 Front LabelBollinger La Grande Annee Brut Rose 2005 Back Bottle ShotBollinger La Grande Annee Brut Rose 2005 Front Bottle Shot

Bollinger La Grande Annee Brut Rose 2005

  • JS96
  • WS94
  • JD93
750ML / 0% ABV
Other Vintages
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  • W&S97
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4.3 5 Ratings
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4.3 5 Ratings
750ML / 0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Grande Annee Brut Rose is salmon pink with copper highlights. Notes of red currant and almonds, then a spicy toasty aroma. Surprisingly vinous, but also very fresh. Cherry, or even kirsch, slightly toasty.

All Bollinger is there: presence and modesty, power and delicacy. This wine is not produced every year, as perfect maturity is required at the date of harvest. Thus, La Grande Annee Brut Rose remains an exception; it is a beautifully structured and full-bodied wine, with a deep color and intense aroma.

Critical Acclaim

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JS 96
James Suckling
A good rest on lees in the cellar through to May 2015 has seen this salmon-colored rosé develop a wealth of dried porcini mushroom aromas that really make a savory statement. It's gently smoky and shows some dried cherry fruits too – a gastronomic dream! The palate's smoothly cut with creamy red-cherry-fruit flavors and hints of pink grapefruit. It freshens into the finish. Thanks especially to a complex layered structure, this really is a brilliant rosé. Drink now.
WS 94
Wine Spectator
Wonderfully aromatic and finely detailed, with a layered profile of dried apricot, raw almond, honey, ground coffee, nutmeg and orange bergamot. Shows power and focus, yet this is set in a sleek, finely knit frame. The chalky minerality firms the long, smoky finish. Disgorged July 2015. Drink now through 2026.
JD 93
Jeb Dunnuck

A cuvée first introduced in 1983, the 2005 La Grande Année Rosé comes from a single parcel and is more savory, tertiary, and mineral-laced than the la Grande Année cuvée. Aged 10 years in bottle on lees, this medium to full-bodied, complex, incredibly pretty 2005 has classic notes of dried cherries, toasted spice, chalky minerality, and dried flowers. It’s a singular beauty that blossoms with time in the glass and should shine for another 10-15 years.

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Bollinger

Champagne Bollinger

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Champagne Bollinger, France
Champagne Bollinger Winery Video

In 1829, Champagne Bollinger introduced an instantly recognizable, dry, toasty style that connoisseurs around the globe have coveted ever since. Six generations of the Bollinger family have maintained that trademark style, and Bollinger is one of the rare Grande Marque houses to be owned, controlled and managed by the same family since it was founded.

With 399 acres of vineyards situated in the best Grands Crus and Premiers Crus villages, Bollinger relies on its own estate for nearly two-thirds of its grape requirements, including the Pinot Noir that gives its Champagne its distinctive roundness and elegance. Bollinger is one of a select few houses that can control the quality of its grape supply so carefully.

Bollinger is renowned for its stringent quality standards. It adheres to traditional methods, including individual vinification of each marc and cru, barrel fermentation (it is the last Champagne house to employ a full-time cooper) and extra-aging on the lees prior to disgorgement.

Members of the British Royal Court were among the first to embrace Bollinger’s unmistakable quality, and Queen Victoria made Bollinger the exclusive purveyor to the Court by Royal Warrant in 1884. Besides royalty, loyal devotees have included heads of state, celebrities and even famous fictional characters: Agent 007, James Bond, demands the exclusive Champagne Bollinger.

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Champagne

France

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Associated with luxury, celebration, and romance, the region, Champagne, is home to the world’s most prized sparkling wine. In order to bear the label, ‘Champagne’, a sparkling wine must originate from this northeastern region of France—called Champagne—and adhere to strict quality standards. Made up of the three towns Reims, Épernay, and Aÿ, it was here that the traditional method of sparkling wine production was both invented and perfected, birthing a winemaking technique as well as a flavor profile that is now emulated worldwide.

Well-drained, limestone and chalky soil defines much of the region, which lend a mineral component to its wines. Champagne’s cold, continental climate promotes ample acidity in its grapes but weather differences from year to year can create significant variation between vintages. While vintage Champagnes are produced in exceptional years, non-vintage cuvées are produced annually from a blend of several years in order to produce Champagnes that maintain a consistent house style.

With nearly negligible exceptions, . These can be blended together or bottled as individual varietal Champagnes, depending on the final style of wine desired. Chardonnay, the only white variety, contributes freshness, elegance, lively acidity and notes of citrus, orchard fruit and white flowers. Pinot Noir and its relative Pinot Meunier, provide the backbone to many blends, adding structure, body and supple red fruit flavors. Wines with a large proportion of Pinot Meunier will be ready to drink earlier, while Pinot Noir contributes to longevity. Whether it is white or rosé, most Champagne is made from a blend of red and white grapes—and uniquely, rosé is often produce by blending together red and white wine. A Champagne made exclusively from Chardonnay will be labeled as ‘blanc de blancs,’ while ones comprised of only red grapes are called ‘blanc de noirs.’

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

PBC9028594_2005 Item# 159024

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