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Bodega Colome Reserva Malbec 2009

Malbec from Salta, Argentina
  • WS91
15.9% ABV
  • WE95
  • JS94
  • RP93
  • RP96
  • WE93
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15.9% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The wine has a black, deep intense color with a nose of ripe black fruit, blackberries and black pepper followed by flavors of loganberry, cinnamon and black currants. This wine is very full bodied with round tannins and finesse. It is structured and elegant yet powerful and refined.

Critical Acclaim

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WS 91
Wine Spectator
This dark, zesty red features bright acidity behind the plum and wild berry fruit, offering savory hints of humus, olive and charred herb on the long, tangy finish.
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Bodega Colome

Bodega Colome

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Bodega Colome, Salta, Argentina
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Bodega Colome is nestled in the Calchaqui Valley, 2300 meters (7500 feet) above sea level, in the Argentine northwest. Founded in 1831, it is one of the oldest existing wineries in Argentina. In 2001, it was acquired by the Hess Family Estates. Those who enjoy their wines recognize in them the true taste of wines made with grapes of the highest quality and grown in the highest vineyards in the world (7218-10,207 feet above sea level) reflecting the soul of its terroir. Bodega y Estancia Colome's philosophy consists in the commitment to implement biodynamic agriculture, whose principles were outlined by the researcher Rudolf Steiner.

The Salta region in northern Argentina is home to world’s highest vineyards. Near the town of Payogasta, the Colomé Altura Máxima vineyard is planted at 10,206 feet in elevation.

Salta is part of the Calchaquí Valley, which benefits from more than 300 days of sun per year, subjecting its vines to considerable ultraviolet radiation. The valley experiences strong high altitude winds, even in the “lower” vineyards, which are planted at 5,413 feet. Because of these elevations and resulting extreme conditions, vines produce lower yields and thicker-skinned grapes, resulting in concentrated, aromatic and well-structured wines.

In a truly unique region, the highly aromatic variety, Torrontes, thrives; intense sun exposure allows full ripening, while cooling winds maintain the grapes’ acidity levels and phenolic balance.

Malbec, Cabernet Sauvignon, Bonarda, Syrah, and, particularly, Tannat have the most potential among reds.

Upscale hotels, beautiful colonial architecture, a majestic Andean backdrop and impressive food and wine make the area attractive among tourists as well.

Salta is the fourth most important Argentine wine-producing region after Mendoza, San Juan, and La Rioja. Its oldest vineyards were planted in 1862.

Known for its big, bold flavors and supple texture, Malbec is most famous for its runaway success in Argentina. However, the variety actually originates in Bordeaux, where it historically contributed color and tannin to blends. After being nearly wiped out by a devastating frost in 1956, it was never significantly replanted, although it continued to flourish under the name Côt in nearby Cahors. A French agronomist who saw great potential for the variety in Mendoza’s hot, high-altitude landscape, brought Malbec to Argentina in 1868. But it did not gain its current reputation as the country's national grape until a surge in popularity in the late 20th century.

In the Glass

Malbec typically expresses deep flavors of blackberry, plum and licorice, appropriately backed by aromas of freshly turned earth and dense, chewy tannins. In warmer, New World regions, such as Mendoza, Malbec will be intensely ripe, and full of fruit and spice. From its homeland in Cahors, its rusticity shines; dusty notes and a beguiling bouquet of violets balance rich, black fruit.

Perfect Parings

Malbec’s rustic character begs for flavorful dishes, like spicy grilled sausages or the classic cassoulet of France’s Southwest. South American iterations are best enjoyed as they would be in Argentina: with a thick, juicy steak.

Sommelier Secret

If you’re trying to please a crowd, Malbec is generally a safe bet. With its combination of bold flavors and soft tannins, it will appeal to basically anyone who enjoys red wine. Malbec also wins bonus points for affordability, as even the most inexpensive examples are often quite good.

CGM5872_2009 Item# 124976