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Bleasdale Frank Potts Red Blend 2001

Bordeaux Red Blends from Australia
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    Winemaker Notes

    A blend of 32% Cabernet Sauvignon, 26% Malbec, 20% Shiraz, 13% Merlot and 9% Petit Verdot, and aged in both American and French barrels, the 2000 "Frank Potts" exhibits rich aromas of cedar wood, spice, vanilla and chocolate notes and ripe black fruits of black current, blackberry, plum and raspberry. The palate is concentrated and full-bodied with a voluptuous and soft textured mouth feel offering exceptional depth of flavor and a minty-chocolately finish that many Cabernet based wines from the region are noted for. This beauty is drinking great now and will continue to develop for another 4-5 years easily.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Bleasdale

    Bleasdale

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    Bleasdale, Australia
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    Bleasdale’s vineyards were founded in 1850 by Frank Potts, making Bleasdale one of Australia's oldest family-owned wineries. Having just celebrated its 150th anniversary, it is the second oldest continuously operated family-owned winery besides Yalumba located in the Barossa Valley.

    Bleasdale, which has 50 hectares under production, produces around 100,000 cases in total. The principal varietals are Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Malbec and the white varietal Verdelho. All the red wines produce the distinctive style of upfront fruit with a soft textural feel to them.

    They also produce in limited quantities a red blend that is named Frank Potts after the founder and uses all five Bordeaux varietals. It is the winery's flagship wine and for the money represents one of the better values in all of Australia. It is definitely a statement wine and illustrates the high quality of fruit that comes out of the Langhorne Creek area.

    Although Bleasdale is firmly connected to its past, it is nonetheless forward-looking with its eye on the 21st century. A new cellar is just now being completed with state-of-the-art technology, alongside a new hospitality area. The old part of the winery is on the National Trust and National Heritage register.

    Australia

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    A large, climatically diverse country producing just about every wine style imaginable, Australia is not just a source of blockbuster Shiraz or inexpensive wine with cute labels, though both can certainly be found here. Australia has a grand winemaking history and some of the oldest vines on the planet, along with a huge range of landscapes and climates; it is impossible to make generalizations about Australian wine. Most regions are concentrated in the south of the country with those inland experiencing warm, dry weather, and those in more coastal areas receiving humid and tropical, or maritime weather patterns. Australia has for several decades been at the forefront of winemaking technology and has widely adopted the use of screwcaps, even for some premium and ultra-premium bottles.

    Shiraz is indeed Australia’s most celebrated and widely planted variety, typically producing bold, supple reds with sweet, jammy fruit and performing best in the Barossa and Hunter Valleys. Cabernet Sauvignon is often blended with Shiraz, and also shines on its own particularly in Coonawarra and Margaret River. Grenache and Mourvèdre (often locally referred to as Mataro) are also popular, both on their own and alongside Shiraz in Rhône blends. Chardonnay is common throughout the country and made in a wide range of styles. Sauvignon Blanc has recently surged in popularity to compete with New Zealand’s distinctive version, and Semillon is often utilized as its blending partner, or in the Hunter Valley, on its own to make complex, age-worthy whites. Riesling thrives in the cool-climate Clare and Eden Valleys. Sticky-sweet fortified wine Rutherglen Muscat is a beloved regional specialty of Victoria. Thanks to the country’s relatively agreeable climate throughout and the openness of its people, experimentation is common and ongoing, and there are a vast array of intriguing varieties to be found.

    Bordeaux Blends

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    One of the world’s most classic and popular styles of red wine, Bordeaux-inspired blends have spread from their homeland in France to nearly every corner of the New World, especially in California, Washington and Australia. Typically based on either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot and supported by Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, these are sometimes referred to in the US as “Meritage” blends. In Bordeaux itself, Cabernet Sauvignon dominates in wines from the Left Bank of the Gironde River, while the Right Bank focuses on Merlot. Often, blends from outside the region are classified as being inspired by one or the other.

    In the Glass

    Cabernet-based, Left-Bank-styled wines are typically more tannic and structured, while Merlot-based wines modeled after the Right Bank are softer and suppler. Cabernet Franc can add herbal notes, while Malbec and Petit Verdot contribute color and structure. Wines from Bordeaux lean towards a highly structured and earthy style whereas New World areas (as in the ones named above) tend to produce bold and fruit-forward blends. Either way, Bordeaux red blends generally have aromas and flavors of black currant, cedar, plum, graphite, and violet, with more red fruit flavors when Merlot makes up a high proportion of the blend.

    Perfect Pairings

    Since Bordeaux red blends are often quite structured and tannic, they pair best with hearty, flavorful and fatty meat dishes. Any type of steak makes for a classic pairing. Equally welcome with these wines would be beef brisket, pot roast, braised lamb or smoked duck.

    Sommelier Secret

    While the region of Bordeaux is limited to a select few approved grape varieties in specified percentages, the New World is free to experiment. Bordeaux blends in California may include equal amounts of Cabernet Franc and Malbec, for example. Occassionally a winemaker might add a small percentage of a non-Bordeaux variety, such as Syrah or Petite Sirah for a desired result.

    WWH366XFPA2_2001 Item# 61576