Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now
Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wineFront shot of wine bottle

Best's Great Western Riesling 2017

Riesling from Australia
  • JH95
  • JS93
11% ABV
All Vintages
Currently Unavailable $21.99
Try the 2016 Vintage 19 99
25
21 99
Save $3.01 (12%)
Ships Thu, Jan 24
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
Add to Cart
1
Limit Reached
0.0 0 Ratings
My Wine Share
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Rate for better recommendations
(256 characters remaining)
Cancel Save

0.0 0 Ratings
11% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The Rieslings of Best’s have a proven ability to mature gracefully for 20 years or more. This example is no exception and its youthful freshness is a good sign for its long life in the cellar. It will gather complex toasty aromas and flavors as the years pass.

Enjoy with fish and chips by the sea in summer or a spicy fish curry by a fire in winter.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
JH 95
Australian Wine Companion
Bright straw-green, fuller than many of its vintage peers. The length of the palate is exceptional, as is the fluid line of the intertwined citrus fruit and acidity, lime and Meyer lemon fruit. The result is a riesling that will be drunk before its due time, and I would be happy to join forces tonight.
JS 93
James Suckling
Another floral riesling showing lots of acacia, honeysuckle and cherry blossoms. Medium-bodied with some fleshy tropical and stone fruit, which are delivered in quite a friendly manner across a bed of steely acidity and right through to the tangy finish.
View More
Best's Great Western

Best's Great Western

View all wine
Best's Great Western, Australia
Image of winery
Great Western is part of Central Victoria’s Grampians wine region - one of Australia’s most historic and highly regarded wine regions. Great Western is a registered sub region (GIC). Situated along the Western Highway, 218 kilometres west of Melbourne, Great Western lies between the township of Stawell and Ararat. The Grampians National Park, two hours' drive west of Melbourne, is a picturesque natural wonder dotted with hidden jewels for the wine buff.

The first grapes were planted at Great Western during the 1850s as the gold mining boom receded and people looked for a more permanent means of livelihood. Vineyards planted in 1867 include grape varieties so rare that several have defied all attempts at identification and are, in all probability, the sole surviving examples in the world.

Grampians has enjoyed a long history of viticulture dominated by production of red wines of longevity, elegance and power. Silky smooth Shiraz with flavors and aromas of red cherry, plum, spice and pepper is typical of the regional style.

Best’s Great Western is recognized internationally for the outstanding quality of their Shiraz.

Australia

View all wine

A large, climatically diverse country producing just about every wine style imaginable, Australia is not just a source of blockbuster Shiraz or inexpensive wine with cute labels, though both can certainly be found here. Australia has a grand winemaking history and some of the oldest vines on the planet, along with a huge range of landscapes and climates; it is impossible to make generalizations about Australian wine. Most regions are concentrated in the south of the country with those inland experiencing warm, dry weather, and those in more coastal areas receiving humid and tropical, or maritime weather patterns. Australia has for several decades been at the forefront of winemaking technology and has widely adopted the use of screwcaps, even for some premium and ultra-premium bottles.

Shiraz is indeed Australia’s most celebrated and widely planted variety, typically producing bold, supple reds with sweet, jammy fruit and performing best in the Barossa and Hunter Valleys. Cabernet Sauvignon is often blended with Shiraz, and also shines on its own particularly in Coonawarra and Margaret River. Grenache and Mourvèdre (often locally referred to as Mataro) are also popular, both on their own and alongside Shiraz in Rhône blends. Chardonnay is common throughout the country and made in a wide range of styles. Sauvignon Blanc has recently surged in popularity to compete with New Zealand’s distinctive version, and Semillon is often utilized as its blending partner, or in the Hunter Valley, on its own to make complex, age-worthy whites. Riesling thrives in the cool-climate Clare and Eden Valleys. Sticky-sweet fortified wine Rutherglen Muscat is a beloved regional specialty of Victoria. Thanks to the country’s relatively agreeable climate throughout and the openness of its people, experimentation is common and ongoing, and there are a vast array of intriguing varieties to be found.

Riesling

View all wine

A regal variety of incredible purity and precision, Riesling possesses a remarkable ability to reflect the character of wherever it is grown while still maintaining easily identifiable typicity. This versatile grape can be just as enjoyable dry or sweet, young or old, still or sparkling and can age longer than nearly any other white variety. Riesling is best known in Germany and Alsace, and is also of great importance in Austria. The variety has also been particularly successful in Australia’s Clare and Eden Valleys, New Zealand, Washington, cooler regions of California, and the Finger Lakes region of New York.

In the Glass

Riesling typically produces wine with relatively low alcohol, high acidity, steely minerality and stone fruit, spice, citrus and floral notes. At its ripest, it leans towards juicy peach, nectarine and pineapple, while cooler climes produce Rieslings more redolent of meyer lemon, lime and green apple. With age, Riesling can become truly revelatory, developing unique, complex aromatics, often with a hint of petrol.

Perfect Pairings

Riesling is quite versatile, enjoying the company of sweet-fleshed fish like sole, most Asian food, especially Thai and Vietnamese (bottlings with some residual sugar and low alcohol are the perfect companions for dishes with substantial spice) and freshly shucked oysters. Sweeter styles work well with fruit-based desserts.

Sommelier Secret

It can be difficult to discern the level of sweetness in a Riesling, and German labeling laws do not make things any easier. Look for the world “trocken” to indicate a dry wine, or “halbtrocken” or “feinherb” for off-dry. Some producers will include a helpful sweetness scale on the back label—happily, a growing trend.

SKRPBE017_2017 Item# 355479