Bartenura Sparkling Moscato Rose (OU Kosher)  Front Label
Bartenura Sparkling Moscato Rose (OU Kosher)  Front Label

Bartenura Sparkling Moscato Rose (OU Kosher)

  • TP91
750ML / 0% ABV
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4.3 23 Ratings
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4.3 23 Ratings
750ML / 0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Light rose color, with a delicate fragrance and sweet taste.

Goes well with fruit, cheese and desserts. A splendid, festive wine to complete a meal. Best served chilled.
This wine is Kosher for Passover

Critical Acclaim

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TP 91
Tasting Panel
Pale pink color; fresh and spicy with a sweet, tangy, and smooth style. A lovely and balanced moscato that's terrific for its price point. Kosher.
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Bartenura

Bartenura

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Bartenura, Italy
Bartenura Winery Video

Ovadia ben Abraham of Bertinoro, near Forlì, was a rabbi and a commentator on the Mishnah, and was commonly known as "The Bartenura." Born in the second half of the 15th century in Italy, he was a pupil of Joseph ben Solomon Colon (known as the Maharik), and became rabbi in Bertinoro, a town in the province of Forlì whence he derived his by-name, and in Castello.

This winery was named in his honor, in tribute to his Italian heritage, combining his greatness with the storied heritage of Italian winemaking. The wines have been sourced from all over the greatest regions of Italy, in pursuit of bringing the best Italy has to offer.

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Asti Wine

Piedmont, Italy

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Recognized as the source of the best Barbera in all of Italy, Asti is a province (as well as major city) in Piedmont, consisting of a gentle, rolling landscape with vineyards, farmland and forests alternating throughout.

Barbera d’Asti can be made in an array of styles from relatively straightforward, fruity and ready for consumption early, to the more concentrated, oak aged version with an ability to cellar impressively for 10-15 years and beyond. Some of the very best sites for Barbera in Asti are concentrated in the subzone of Nizza Monferrato. Other red varieties grown here include Freisa, Grignolino and Dolcetto, which can be bottled varietally or blended into Barbera.

Historically consumers commonly associated the Asti region with Asti Spumante and Moscato d’Asti, both playful, aromatic, sparkling wines made from the Muscat grape. Asti Spumante is less sweet, fully fizzy and more alcoholic (yet still clocking in at only around 9% alcohol) while Moscato d’Asti is sweeter, gently sparkling (“frizzante”) and closer to 5 or 6% alcohol. Each is produced in stainless steel tanks to preserve the fresh and fruity flavors of the grape, often including peach, apricot, lychee and rose petal. Asti is also the spot for the pink-hued Brachetto d'Acqui, a slightly sparkling wine ready to charm with its raspberry and rose flavors and aromas.

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

SOU468505_0 Item# 517292

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