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Barone Fini Merlot 2009

Merlot from Italy
  • WS87
0% ABV
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0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Flavors of rich, ripe cherries and plums are enriched by the smooth, deep, well-structured background. A beautifully balanced wine with a long, velvety finish.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 87
Wine Spectator
This clean, fleshy Merlot shows a base of smoke and spice, with accents of raspberry preserves, plum, violet and linzer torte.
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Barone Fini

Barone Fini

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Barone Fini, Italy
Winemaking has consistently been part of our family business for at least six centuries and was officially recorded by the administration of the Republic of Venice on October 24, 1479 when we were given duty free privileges.

Today, we take a modern approach to winemaking with two primary objectives: first, producing quality, approachable wines, and second, keeping our family-owned and operated business market-nimble, involving all of the members of our immediate family.

Our wines are entirely grown and produced in the Trentino-Alto Adige area to our winemaking specifications, where for decades our long-standing relationships and knowledge of the area gives us access to the best grapes grown from the vineyards we choose. We have only produced D.O.C. wines, proving that our wines meet the highest standards from year to year. For generations Barone Fini wines have been produced with the minimal aid of human interference. Our family has always believed that maintaining the natural balance of the plant and making our wine with the least human intervention only makes sense. The Fini family’s strong cultural history has always promoted culvitation techniques that minimize environmental impact. We guarantee we will continue to pursue our natural ways for generations to come.

Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes grow in every region throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean. Naturally, most Italian regions enjoy a Mediterranean climate and a notable coastline, if not coastline on all borders, as is the case with the islands of Sicily and Sardinia.

The Alps in the northern regions of Valle d'Aosta, Lombardy and Alto Adige as examples, create favorable conditions for cool-climate varieties, while the Apennine Mountains, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south, affect climate, grape variety and harvest periods throughout. Considering its variable terrain and conditions, it's still safe to say that most high quality viticulture in Italy takes place on picturesque hillsides.

Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but are declining in popularity, especially as younger growers take interest in reviving local varieties. Most important are Sangiovese, reaching its greatest potential in Tuscany and Nebbiolo, the prized grape of Piedmont, producing single varietal, age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Corvina, Montepulciano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and of course the whites, Pinot Grigio and Trebbiano. The list goes on.

An easy-going red variety with generous fruit and a supple texture, Merlot’s subtle tannins make it perfect for early drinking and allow it to pair with a wide range of foods. But the grape also has enough stuffing to make serious, world-renowned wines. One simply needs to look to Bordeaux to understand Merlot's status as a noble variety. On the region’s Right Bank, in St. Emilion and Pomerol, it dominates in blends with Cabernet Franc. On the Left Bank in the Medoc, it plays a supporting role to (and helps soften) Cabernet Sauvignon—in both cases resulting in some of the longest-lived and highest-quality wines in the world. They are often emulated elsewhere in Bordeaux-style blends, particularly in California’s Napa Valley, where Merlot also frequently shines on its own.

In the Glass

Merlot is known for its soft, silky texture and approachable flavors of ripe plum, red and black cherry and raspberry. In a cool climate, you may find earthier notes alongside dried herbs, tobacco and tar, while Merlot from warmer regions is generally more straightforward and fruit-focused.

Perfect Pairings

Lamb with Merlot is an ideal match—the sweetness of the meat picks up on the sweet fruit flavors of the wine to create a harmonious balance. Merlot’s gentle tannins allow for a hint of spice and its medium weight and bright acidity permit the possibilities of simple pizza or pasta with red sauce—overall, an extremely versatile food wine.

Sommelier Secret

Since the release of the 2004 film Sideways, Merlot's repuation has taken a big hit, and more than a decade later has yet to fully recover, though it is on its way. What many viewers didn't realize was that as much as Miles derided the variety, the prized wine of his collection—a 1961 Château Cheval Blanc—is made from a blend of Merlot with Cabernet Franc.

SOU17236_2009 Item# 112218