Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now
Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wineFront shot of wine bottleBack shot of wine bottle

Baker Lane Estate Vineyard Syrah 2009

Syrah/Shiraz from Sonoma County, California
    13.6% ABV
    • W&S92
    • W&S91
    • WE91
    All Vintages
    Currently Unavailable $37.99
    Try the 2012 Vintage 45 99
    45
    37 99
    Save $7.01 (16%)
    Ships Wed, Nov 21
    Limit 0 bottles per customer
    Sold in increments of 0
    Add to Cart
    1
    Limit Reached
    0.0 0 Ratings
    My Wine Share
    Vintage Alert
    Alert me when new vintages are available
    Rate for better recommendations
    (256 characters remaining)
    Cancel Save

    0.0 0 Ratings
    13.6% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    All in all, we have made a wine with a modest alcohol level that nevertheless presented the most complete expression of the Baker Lane terroir to date. Its balance, finesse, and penetrating depth have been a compelling guide for our approach to every harvest since.

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Baker Lane

    Baker Lane

    View all wine
    Baker Lane, Sonoma County, California
    Image of winery
    Certainly others say that it’s about place, or it begins in the vineyard, but it’s hard to overstate the relevance of that perspective to our efforts at Baker Lane Vineyards. It started when we came upon the fifteen acre hillside spot at the end of Baker Lane (yes it’s a real place, not a fanciful name) in 2002. Although covered at the time in apples, the area’s many surrounding vineyards indicated a clear precedence for viticulture alongside many of the legacy orchards.

    Nothing then was particularly exotic about planting vines in this part of West Sonoma County, that is planting Pinot Noir. Syrah and Viognier though were something of a different story. But, if there is anything about the unfolding narrative of California viticulture, it’s an ever-evolving picture. There are many sites now planted to grapes that would have been unthinkable 25 years ago. Similarly, as winegrowers seek to cultivate fruit with more precise flavors, acid retention and overall balance, the decision to push the envelope climatically becomes a natural choice.

    Just as European winemakers have long championed the distinction of their terroir, we in California are legitimately celebrating their own sense of place. The vivid expression of vineyard character that cooler viticultural sites avails has driven this opportunity more than any other factor. Through 10 harvests we’re gratified to gather the consistent detail and character of their wines. Just as a child has to grow up a bit to reveal its personality, the accumulating collection of flavors presented by our family of wines is helping them know what their working with, and in turn constantly sharpening our approach to the care of the vines. It’s an exciting process to sustainably nurture our grapes and direct them in to the bottle. We hope that the fruit of our efforts is delicious for you as well.

    California

    Red Wine

    View all wine

    A major force on the global playing field, California is the world’s fourth largest wine-producing region on the planet and the majority of land under vine here is devoted to red varieties—they cover nearly double the vineyard acreage compared to whites.

    While the state’s incredibly diverse terrain and microclimates allow for countless red wine styles, the one factor unifying all California red wine is the abundance of sunshine and a long, consistent growing season, which leads to well-developed and fully ripened fruit.

    The most famous region today, of course, is the acclaimed Napa Valley, where Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Bordeaux Blends garner global attention and in some cases, "cult" status.

    Sonoma County, nestled between Napa Valley and the Pacific Ocean, claims great variability in geography and microclimates with vineyards climbing up mountains, reaching far into valleys and stretching along some the state’s most dramatic coastlines. Here world-class Pinot Noir is possible from Sonoma’s cooler sites while Zinfandel and Cabernet Sauvignon do well in its warmer locations.

    The Central Coast, Lodi and the Sierra Foothills also excel in the production of Zinfandel, Cabernet Sauvignon and remain active frontiers for newer varieties, namely Rhône and Spanish.

    The cool Anderson Valley in California’s North Coast region is a fantastic source of Pinot noir.

    Winemaking in California dates back to the 18th century when Spanish missionaries planted the first wine grapes. But the industry experienced its first boom with the Gold Rush in the last half of the 19th century when miners brought vines to the Sierra Foothills.

    SPRBLNESY09C_2009 Item# 141934