Argyle Vintage Brut Rose 2016

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    Argyle Vintage Brut Rose 2016  Front Bottle Shot
    Argyle Vintage Brut Rose 2016  Front Bottle Shot Argyle Vintage Brut Rose 2016  Front Label

    Product Details


    Varietal

    Region

    Producer

    Vintage
    2016

    Size
    750ML

    ABV
    12.5%

    Features
    Green Wine

    Winemaker Notes

    The 2016 sparkling wine vintage in the Willamette Valley was generous, showcasing the enticing allure and focused definition the region has to offer. Blended between our two high elevation vineyards, 2016 Brut Rosé displays the delicate refinement of the Dundee Hills and the mineral tension of the Eola-Amity Hills. Bright, medium salmon-pink hue in color and perfume of rose petal, spring blossom and cardamom lead to an elegant, supple structure, and ginger-laced finish.

    Blend:47% Pinot Noir, 37% Chardonnay, 16% Pinot Meunier

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    Argyle

    Argyle

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    Argyle, Oregon
    Argyle Top Domestic Sparkling Wine House Winery Image

    Founded in 1987 as Oregon's original sparkling wine house, Argyle quickly stood out as a study in contrasts—honoring the deep traditions of wine and embracing innovation and experimentation; proud to be Oregonian and pulling knowledge from winemakers around the world. When common knowledge said a winery could produce great sparkling wine or great still wine Argyle asked "why not both?", answering the question with acclaimed wines from Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Pinot Meunier, and Riesling.

    Their four estate vineyards make up nearly 500 acres in the Willamette Valley, with the majority in the Eola-Amity Hills and Dundee Hills nested AVAs. Willamette Valley's cool, late ripening climate produces age worthy base wines. The vineyards, nearing 1000' in elevation, ensure fruit develops slowly, retains acidity, and promotes flavor ripeness before sugar ripeness.

    Nate Klostermann is the second winemaker in Argyle's 35-year history and has emerged as one of Oregon's most gifted winemakers. He currently celebrates nearly two decades at Argyle and continues to say he "landed in a good spot" when he arrived at Argyle to work his first harvest. With his fine-tuned winemaking skills and passion for Oregon wine, Nate is now recognized for making elegant and complex sparkling wines along with vibrant and impeccably balanced Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Riesling and Pinot Meunier.

    Built on the foundation of "Grower first", Argyle's viticulture team is taking sustainable farming a step further with regenerative farming. Practices such as utilizing custom cover crop and biochar enhanced compost made in house provide natural nutrient additions. Minimal tilling encourages growth of microbes in the soil, water retention and reduces erosion. Blue bird and kestrel habitats are scattered around various vineyards for pest control. Local sheep are brought into the vineyards to manage grass and weeds, and while they aren't a requirement for winemaking, the team has developed bee sanctuaries. These sanctuaries are parcels of fallow land, now dedicated to growing flowers pollinators and beneficial insects.

    Their commitment to and partnerships with community organizations, sustainability, Oregon's winegrowing industry, and their employees and families are foundational to Argyle's approach. Argyle makes contributions to non-profit organizations committed to improving the lives of vineyard workers and non-profit organizations that support the arts. These organizations include AHIVOY, ¡Salud!, The Roots Fund, PDX Jazz, Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland Center Stage, and Portland Opera.

    Argyle is the only winery to land on Wine Spectator's Top 100 list for Sparkling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

    Image for Sparkling Rosé Wine: Champagne, Prosecco & More content section

    What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

    Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

    How is sparkling rosé wine made?

    There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

    What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

    The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

    How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

    Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

    How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

    Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

    Image for Willamette Valley Wine Oregon content section
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    One of Pinot Noir's most successful New World outposts, the Willamette Valley is the largest and most important AVA in Oregon. With a continental climate moderated by the influence of the Pacific Ocean, it is perfect for cool-climate viticulture and the production of elegant wines.

    Mountain ranges bordering three sides of the valley, particularly the Chehalem Mountains, provide the option for higher-elevation vineyard sites.

    The valley's three prominent soil types (volcanic, sedimentary and silty, loess) make it unique and create significant differences in wine styles among its vineyards and sub-AVAs. The iron-rich, basalt-based, Jory volcanic soils found commonly in the Dundee Hills are rich in clay and hold water well; the chalky, sedimentary soils of Ribbon Ridge, Yamhill-Carlton and McMinnville encourage complex root systems as vines struggle to search for water and minerals. In the most southern stretch of the Willamette, the Eola-Amity Hills sub-AVA soils are mixed, shallow and well-drained. The Hills' close proximity to the Van Duzer Corridor (which became its own appellation as of 2019) also creates grapes with great concentration and firm acidity, leading to wines that perfectly express both power and grace.

    Though Pinot noir enjoys the limelight here, Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc and Chardonnay also thrive in the Willamette. Increasing curiosity has risen recently in the potential of others like Grüner Veltliner, Chenin Blanc and Gamay.

    SWS969717_2016 Item# 676925

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