Amelia Brut Rose Cremant de Bordeaux Front Label
Amelia Brut Rose Cremant de Bordeaux Front LabelAmelia Brut Rose Cremant de Bordeaux Front Bottle Shot

Amelia Brut Rose Cremant de Bordeaux

  • WW89
750ML / 12.5% ABV
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4.0 34 Ratings
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4.0 34 Ratings
750ML / 12.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Amelia displays aromas and flavors of strawberry and red currant, with a medium body and elegant finish. A richness on the palate and fine bubbles result from vinification using the Method Traditionnelle and aging on the lees.

Critical Acclaim

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WW 89
Wilfred Wong of Wine.com
COMMENTARY: One of the world's best values in sparkling wines is Crémant de Bordeaux. The Ameilia® Brut Rosé is fresh, clean, and lively. TASTING NOTES: This wine offers fresh, tart raspberries in its aromas and flavors. Its crisp finish makes a beautiful choice with raw oysters and a healthy squeeze of lemon. (Tasted: June 15, 2018, San Francisco, CA)
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Amelia

Amelia

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Amelia, France
A name meaning “striving,” our wine is inspired by Amelia Earhart. We translate her ambitious spirit through our meticulous, labor intensive work that is essential to crafting Rosé Crémant de Bordeaux in the traditional method. Crémant is the term for sparkling wine from France made outside of the Champagne region.
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One of the most important wine regions of the world, Bordeaux is a powerhouse producer of wines of all colors, sweetness levels, and price points. Separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a coastal pine forest, this relatively flat region has a mild maritime climate, marked by cool wet winters and warm summers. Annual weather differences create significant vintage variations, making Bordeaux an exciting wine region to follow.

The Gironde estuary, a defining feature of Bordeaux, separates most of the region into the Left Bank and the Right Bank. Farther inland, where the Gironde splits into the Garonne and Dordogne Rivers, the bucolic, rolling hills of the area in between, called Entre-Deux-Mers, is a source of great quality, approachable reds and whites.

The Left Bank, dominated by Cabernet Sauvignon, contains the Médoc, Graves, and Sauternes, as well as the region’s most famous chateaux. Merlot is important here as the perfect blending grape for Cabernet Sauvignon adding plush fruit and softening Cabernet's sometimes hefty tannins. Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec may also be used in the Left Bank Bordeaux wine blends.

Merlot is the principal Bordeaux wine variety of the Right Bank; Cabernet Franc adds structure and complexity to Merlot, creating wines that are concentrated, supple, and more imminently ready for drinking, compared with their Left Bank counterparts. Key appellations of the Right Bank include St. Emilion and Pomerol.

Dry and sweet Bordeaux white wines are produced throughout the region from Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, and sometimes Muscadelle or Sauvignon Gris. Some of the finest dry whites can be found in the Graves sub-appellation of Pessac-Léognan, while Sauternes is undisputedly the gold standard for sweet wines. Small amounts of rosé and sparkling Bordeaux wines are made in the region as well.

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

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