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Alvear Ximenez de Anada (375ML half-bottle) 2011

Sherry from Spain
  • RP100
    0% ABV
    All Vintages
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      Winemaker Notes

      Critical Acclaim

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      RP 100
      Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
      Alvear's 2011 Pedro Ximenez de Anada is the most amazing Pedro Ximenez I have ever tasted. It may also be one of the first to be vintage-dated. The grapes were hand-harvested in September, then allowed to dry in the sunshine until they began fermentation, which is ultimately arrested by the addition of spirits. The wine spent six months in large American oak prior to being bottled. It is an amazing effort that looks like molasses. Notes of macerated figs, chocolate and caramelized tropical fruits emerge from this full-bodied, unctuously-textured wine. While sweet, it has enough acidity to balance out its richness. This astonishing 2011 Pedro Ximenez will last as long as any reader of this newsletter.
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      Alvear

      Alvear

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      Alvear, Spain
      Image of winery
      Alvear S.A. was established by Don Diego de Alvear in 1729, and since that time has remained under control of the Alvear family. This is the oldest winery in the region and its fino is today one of the three most popular fino wines in Spain. Located in the town of Montilla, in the province of Cordoba, in the interior of Andalucia. Grapes are sourced from their own vineyards, of 307.2 acres. They also buy grapes and wines from local growers. The area is dominated by small parcels. The terrain is formed by undulating hills and slopes of a singular whitish color. There are two basic types of soil: Albero and Arenas. Albero is a whitish, chalky soil, found on the higher ground in the Sierra de Montilla and Moriles Alto, both of which are classified as superior zones and produce finos of good, clean character. This type of soil is highly absorbent and can supply the vines with needed water during the long, dry summers. The sun bakes the surface to a hard crust, reflecting the heat and preventing the moisture from evaporating. Arenas is found in the Ruedos made up of largely sand, with some stony clay and a small proportion of limestone. The climate is Southern continental, with hot summers, reaching at times temperatures of 120°F, resulting in early harvests. The temperature drops sharply at night, cooling the fermenting musts. Winters are cold.

      Known for bold reds, crisp whites and distinctive sparkling and fortified wines, Spain has embraced international varieties and wine styles while continuing to place primary emphasis on its own native grapes. Though the country’s climate is diverse, it is generally hot and dry. In the center of the country lies a vast, arid plateau known as the Meseta Central, characterized by extremely hot summers and frequent drought.

      Rioja is Spain’s best-known region, where earthy, age-worthy reds are made from Tempranillo and Garnacha (Grenache). Rioja also produces rich, nutty whites from the local Viura grape.

      Ribera del Duero is gaining ground with its single varietal Tempranillo wines, recognized for their concentration of fruit and opulence. Priorat, a sub-region of Catalonia, specializes in bold, full-bodied red blends of Garnacha (Grenache), Cariñena (Carignan), and often Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon. Catalonia is also home to Cava, a sparkling wine made in the traditional method but from indigenous varieties. In the cool, damp northwest region of Galicia, refreshing white Albariño and Verdejo dominate.

      Sherry, Spain’s famous fortified wine, is produced in a wide range of styles from dry to lusciously sweet at the country’s southern tip in Jerez.

      Most sherries are dry and meant to pair alongside food but Americans have traditionally focused on the sweet ones. Sherry comes from only one place in the entire world, Andalucía, where the soil and unique seasonal changes give an unsurpassed character to its wines. The many styles change with the process of production, not really the grape, though certain styles are reserved for different grapes. The main grapes are Palomino, Pedro Ximénez and Muscat of Alexandria.

      Pedro Ximénez can make some amazing sweet sherries. Cream Sherry is technically the sweetest, darkest style of Sherry, except sometimes Pedro Ximénez can be sweeter. The rest of the styles are dry and dependent on the action of flor, which are benevolent film-forming yeasts that make a floating veil on the surface of the wine and protect it from oxidation.

      Fino, from Jerez, and Manzanilla, from the humid and cool coastal town of Sanlúcar de Barrameda, are the lightest styles and are meant to be drunk young.

      Amontillado happens when a Fino’s layer of flor fades and the wine starts to oxidize. Quite simply it is an aged Fino that has a darker color and richer palate.

      When flor yeast dies unexpectedly, the result is Palo Cortado. Palo Cortado Sherries can behave like Amontillado on the palate but often show a greater balance of richness and delicacy.

      Oloroso never develops flor but is oxidized for five to twenty five years and become aromatic and strong like a fine bourbon.

      GZT10041305_0 Item# 130762