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A to Z Rose Bubbles

    750ML / 12.5% ABV
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    3.9 48 Ratings
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    3.9 48 Ratings
    750ML / 12.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    The lovely, pale pink A to Z Bubbles invite with juicy, ripe fruit aromas. Notes of strawberry, raspberry, watermelon, cherry, white peach, nectarine and apricot are joined by white flowers and a hint of creaminess. The bubbles dance on the tongue with mouth-watering acidity that leaves one wanting more.

    Blend: 90% Pinot Noir, 10% Chardonnay

    Critical Acclaim

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    A to Z

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    A to Z, Oregon
    A to Z Winery Video

    A to Z Wineworks was established in 2002 by four Oregon wine industry veterans to consistently offer quality wines that capture the Essence of Oregon. Five times named a ‘Best for the World’ B Corp, A to Z’s commitment to excellence is matched by a belief in fair value and sustainability in business as well as farming. Recognition for A to Z wines as offering dependable quality for great value continues today, making A to Z the top-selling Oregon wine brand.

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    Home to some of America’s most celebrated Pinot Noir, Oregon maintains a tight focus on small production, high quality wine even while the state’s industry enjoys steady growth. As a world-renowned wine region, Oregon has more than 700 wineries and is home to well over 70 grape varieties. With a mostly Mediterranean climate, its cooler and wetter regions lie in the west, close to the Pacific Coast.

    By far the most reputed Oregon wine region is the Willamette Valley, which is further subdivided into six smaller appellations: Chehalem Mountains, Dundee Hills, Eola-Amity Hills, McMinnville, Ribbon Ridge and Yamhill-Carlton.

    The Oregon wine region's most obvious success story is with Pinot Noir, which here takes on a personality that could be described in general terms as somewhere in between the wines of California and Burgundy—and is often more affordable than either one. The best Willamette Pinot noir has a rare combination of red and black fruit, elegant balance, high acidity and rustic earth. While completely enjoyable in their youth, some of the better, single vineyard or appellation-specific Pinot noirs can often benefit from some cellar time.

    Other AVAs in Oregon’s west worth noting include Umpqua Valley and Rogue Valley.

    In the east are Snake River Valley, which overlaps into Idaho, and Columbia Valley, which Oregon shares with Washington. Summers are hot and dry in these regions but winters are cold and rainy.

    Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Riesling and Pinot blanc also grow successfully in Oregon.

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    What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

    Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

    How is sparkling rosé wine made?

    There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

    What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

    The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

    How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

    Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

    How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

    Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

    SOU933537_0 Item# 506275

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