Scarpetta Timido Brut Rose Front Label
Scarpetta Timido Brut Rose Front LabelScarpetta Timido Brut Rose Front Bottle Shot

Scarpetta Timido Brut Rose

    750ML / 12% ABV
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    4.6 5 Ratings
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    4.6 5 Ratings
    750ML / 12% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Bright pink, rosy and vibrant. Aromas of strawberries and fresh cut flowers. On the palate, this wine is crisp and dry with delicate Flavors of juicy strawberries and fresh herbs. This Spumante Rose is great to have before or after meals. Wonderful with salads, plates of salumi or a lovely grilled salmon.

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    Scarpetta

    Scarpetta

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    Scarpetta, Italy
    Scarpetta is a Friulian inspired brand created by Master Sommelier Bobby Stuckey and former French Laundry Chef Lachlan Patterson. Bobby and Lachlan teamed up to open Frasca, an authentic Friulian restaurant in Boulder, Colorado. They travel to Friuli several times a year looking to import local regional foods and recipes. Their passion for all things Friuli inspired the creation of their own brand, Scarpetta, in 2007. It began with 50 cases of old vine Friulano produced to be sold at Frasca. The demand for the wine was strong, and customers began to request new flavors. So they slowly expanded the line to include Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc and a sparkling rosé called Timido. Bobby’s love of Barbera from Monferrato eventually expanded the project to include this varietal as well. The ultimate goal of the brand is to make affordable everyday wines that taste special.
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    Italian Wine

    Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture virtually inextricable from red, white and sparkling wine. Wine grapes grow in every region throughout Italy—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean.

    Italian Wine Regions

    Naturally, most Italian wine regions enjoy a Mediterranean climate and a notable coastline, if not coastline on all borders, as is the case with the islands of Sicily and Sardinia. The Alps in the northern regions of Valle d'Aosta, Lombardy and Alto Adige create favorable conditions for cool-climate grape varieties. The Apennine Mountains, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south, affect climate, grape variety and harvest periods throughout. Considering the variable terrain and conditions, it is still safe to say that most high quality viticulture in Italy takes place on picturesque hillsides.

    Italian Grape Varieties

    Italy boasts more indigenous grape varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most Italian wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but are declining in popularity, especially as younger growers take interest in reviving local varieties. Most important are Sangiovese, reaching its greatest potential in Tuscany, as well as Nebbiolo, the prized grape of Piedmont, producing single varietal, age-worthy Piedmontese wines. Other important varieties include Corvina, Montepulciano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and of course the white wines, Trebbiano, Verdicchio and Garganega. The list goes on.

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    What are the different types of Champagne and sparkling wine?

    Beloved for its lively bubbles, sparkling wine is the ultimate beverage for any festivity, whether it's a major celebration or a mere merrymaking of nothing much! Sparkling wine is made throughout the winemaking world, but only can be called “Champagne” if it comes from the Champagne region of France and is made using what is referred to as the "traditional method." Other regions have their own specialties—Crémant in other parts of France, Cava in Spain and Prosecco in Italy, to name a few. New World regions like California, Australia and New Zealand enjoy the freedom to make many styles, with production methods and traditions defined locally. In a dry style, Champagne and sparkling wine goes with just about any type of food. Sweet styles are not uncommon and among both dry and sweet, you'll find white, rosé—or even red!—examples.

    How is Champagne and sparkling wine made?

    Champagne, Crémant, Cava and many other sparkling wines of the world are made using the traditional method, in which the second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) takes place inside the bottle. With this method, spent yeast cells remain in contact with the wine during bottle aging, giving it a creamy mouthful, toasted bread or brioche qualities and in many cases, the capacity to age. For Prosecco, the carbonation process usually occurs in a stainless steel tank (before bottling) to preserve the fresh fruity and floral aromas imminent in this style.

    What gives Champagne and sparkling wine its bubbles?

    The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel.

    How do you serve Champagne and sparkling wine?

    Ideally for storing Champagne and sparkling wine in any long-term sense, they should be at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool Champagne and sparkling wine down to about 40F to 50F. (Most refrigerators are colder than this.) As for drinking Champagne and sparkling wine, the best glasses have a stem and flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) to show.

    How long does Champagne and sparkling wine last?

    Most sparkling wines like Prosecco, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Wines made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

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