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Flat front label of wine

Mas Carlot Costieres de Nimes Rouge Les Enfants Terribles 2013

Rhone Red Blends from Costieres de Nimes, Rhone, France
  • RP89
14% ABV
  • RP91
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14% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Smoked herbs, tobacco, and truffle are all present in this upfront, fruit driven profile. This lovely wine contains spices, licorice, violet and leather aromas, blackberry and raspberry fruits. This is medium-bodied.

Excellent with duck breast and raspberry sauce

Blend: 60% Mourvedre, 40% Syrah

Critical Acclaim

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RP 89
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Made from 60% Mourvedre and 40% Syrah, and a wine I consider to be a year in, year out value, the 2013 Costieres de Nimes les Enfants Terribles spent 12 months in equal parts barrel and tank before being bottled. Notions of blueberries, blackberries, wild herbs and truffle all emerge from this medium to full-bodied southern Rhone that has terrific ripeness (especially in the vintage), notable purity and a great finish. It's hard to resist now, but I suspect it will still be drinking nicely at age ten.
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Mas Carlot

Mas Carlot

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Mas Carlot, Costieres de Nimes, Rhone, France
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In the old Provençal dialect, "Mas" means farm, and Nathalie Blanc-Marès is beautifully managing this 75 hectares farm with the aid of her husband Cyril Marès, owner of the neighboring property Mas des Bressades (yes, she married the boy-next-door). They are a great Provençal family - young and energetic with great vision and talent. Mas Carlot has 20 hectares planted to white varietals. The Clairette de Bellegarde is older than the appellation of Costières de Nîmes. It was created in 1952 and is planted exclusively with Clairette. Clairette is one of the main grapes for Châteauneuf-du-Pape. This cuvée is produced from vines planted in 1946 and harvested at 25 hl/h or about 1 ½ tons per acre. This wine is vinified in stainless steel which allows the wine to remain fresh and aged sur lie in tank after fermentation. The wine is rich on the palate and displays bright orchard fruit with hints of white pepper on the finish.

Costieres de Nimes

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Gently rolling hills covered by large, round stones on south-facing slopes, Costieres de Nimes is a substantial IGP zone that was formerly considered part of the Languedoc. Today it is included as a section of the southern Rhone; its climate, topography and wines put it more in line with that appellation. Grenache is its most important red variety, along with Mourvedre, Syrah and Carignan. Half of the production here is rosé.

Rhône Blends

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With bold fruit flavors and accents of spice, Rhône red blends originated in France’s Southern Rhône valley and have become popular in Priorat, Washington, South Australia, and California’s Central Coast. In the Rhône itself, 19 grape varieties are permitted for use, but many of these blends, are based on Grenache and supported by Syrah and Mourvèdre, earning the nickname “GSM blends.” Côtes du Rhône and Châteauneuf-du-Pape are perhaps the best-known outposts for these wines. Other varieties that may be found in Rhône blends include Carignan, Cinsault, and Counoise.

In the Glass

The taste profile of a Rhône blend will vary according to its individual components, as each variety brings something different to the glass. Grenache, which often forms the base of these blends, is the lightest in color but contributes plenty of ripe red fruit, a plush texture, and often high levels of alcohol. Syrah supplies darker fruit flavors, along with savory, spicy, and meaty notes. Mourvèdre is responsible for a floral perfume as well as body, tannin, and a healthy dose of color. New World examples will lie further along the fruit-forward end of the spectrum, while those from the Old World taste and smell much earthier, often with a “barnyard” character that is attractive to many fans of these wines.

Perfect Pairings

Rhône red blends typically make for very food-friendly wines. Depending on the weight and alcohol level, these can work with a wide variety of meat-based dishes—they play equally well with beef, pork, duck, lamb, or game. With their high acidity, these wines are best-matched with salty or fatty foods, and can handle the acidity of tomato sauce in pizza or pasta. Braised beef cheeks, grilled lamb sausages, or roasted squab are all fine pairings.

Sommelier Secret

Some regions like to put their own local spin on the Rhône red blend—for example, in Australia’s Barossa Valley, Shiraz is commonly blended with Cabernet Sauvignon to add structure, tannin, and a long finish. Grenache-based blends from Priorat often include Carignan (known locally as Cariñena) and Syrah, but also international varieties like Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. In California, anything goes, and it is not uncommon to see Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, or even Tempranillo make an appearance.

DSLD623_13_0102_2013 Item# 272807