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Peter Zemmer Chardonnay 1996

Chardonnay from Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy
    0% ABV
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    Winemaker Notes

    A wine with a broad and colorful palette of fruit aromas, juicy, flavorful, and an inviting and continuous lasting quality.

    Color: greenish-yellow

    Bouquet: delicate, characteristic, with the fruitiness of banana and melon

    Flavor: dry, fresh, lively, with a pleasing fullness

    Recommended Pairings:Appetizers, pasta dishes, and white meats

    Critical Acclaim

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    Peter Zemmer

    Peter Zemmer

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    Peter Zemmer, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy
    Since the year 1928, when Peter Zemmer founded a wine brokerage business, more than a half century has passed and the winery of the Zemmer family, presently under the prudent direction of Mr. Helmuth Zemmer, has developed into one of the leading wineries in South Tyrol. The wide variety of planting locations and grape varieties and the expert management of the proprietor (with his sons at his side) result in a broad range of full-bodied red wines and a diverse palette of top-cru white wines. The harvest arrives every year at the most modernly outfitted winery from its own vineyards and from over 100 winegrowers who are tightly bound to tradition. Environmentally conscious care of the vines and soil, as well as yield reductions in the vineyards, long ago ceased for them to be merely empty catchwords.

    Trentino-Alto Adige

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    A mountainous northern Italian region heavily influenced by German culture, Trentino-Alto Adige is actually made up of two separate but similar regions: Alto Adige and Trentino.

    Trentino, the southern half, is primarily Italian-speaking and largely responsible for the production of non-native, international grapes. There is a significant quantity of Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio and Merlot produced. But Trentino's native and most unique red variety, Teroldego, while still rare, is gaining popularity. It produces a deeply colored red wine rich in wild blackberry, herb, coffee and cocoa.

    The rugged terrain of German-speaking Alto Adige (also referred to as Südtirol) focuses on small-scale viticulture, with great value placed on local varieties—though international varieties have been widely planted since the 1800s. Sheltered by the Alps from harsh northerly winds, many of the best vineyards are at extreme altitude but on steep slopes to increase sunlight exposure.

    Dominant red varieties include the bold, herbaceous Lagrein and delicate, strawberry-kissed, Schiava, in addition to some Pinot Nero.

    The primary white grapes are Pinot grigio, Gewürztraminer, Chardonnay and Pinot blanc, as well as smaller plantings of Sauvignon blanc, Müller Thurgau. These tend to be bright and refreshing with crisp acidity and just the right amount of texture. Some of the highest quality Pinot grigio in Italy is made here.

    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

    ARAIA055_1996 Item# 12170