Mosquita Muerta Sapo de Otro Pozo Red Blend 2018  Front Label
Mosquita Muerta Sapo de Otro Pozo Red Blend 2018  Front LabelMosquita Muerta Sapo de Otro Pozo Red Blend 2018  Front Bottle Shot

Mosquita Muerta Sapo de Otro Pozo Red Blend 2018

  • RP93
750ML / 13.9% ABV
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750ML / 13.9% ABV

Winemaker Notes

On the nose, smoky and spicy aromas from oak influence combined with notes of aromatic herbs, wild berries and flowers. It has a round palate with great acidity and round tannins. A great example of Uco Valley terroir.

Blend: 60% Malbec, 20% Syrah, 20% Cabernet Franc

Critical Acclaim

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RP 93
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
2018 was an excellent vintage in Mendoza, and the wines from that year show great clarity and freshness while keeping the character and clout from the zone. The 2018 Sapo de Otro Pozo is a red blend of 60% Malbec and 20% each Cabernet Franc and Syrah from the Valle de Uco (Los Chacayes and El Manzano) with good ripeness and great acidity.
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Mosquita Muerta

Mosquita Muerta

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Mosquita Muerta, South America
Mosquita Muerta Mosquita Muerta Winery Winery Image

 "Mosquita Muerta" is an expression in Spanish which is used to describe a person with apparently little potential for success who ends up accomplishing a remarkable feat. Jose Millán chose this name for his project to mock those in the region who doubted of his potential as a wine business entrepreneur.

“I started in 2009 with the main idea of creating Premium Blends, and not only Malbec. To accomplish this, we do a careful selection of the different varietal, from different vineyards at the foothills of the Andes Mountains, in the most important wine regions from Mendoza, Argentina.“ – José Millan

Their philosophy is to use multiples fermentation and aging techniques at the winery with all their wines in order to deliver stunning hand-crafted wines.

This is a very personal project because José is the one who named and defined each wine. Behind every Mosquita Muerta wine there’s a story from José that he wants to tell us…

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Mendoza Wine

Argentina

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By far the largest and best-known winemaking province in Argentina, Mendoza is responsible for over 70% of the country’s enological output. Set in the eastern foothills of the Andes Mountains, the climate is dry and continental, presenting relatively few challenges for viticulturists during the growing season. Mendoza, divided into several distinctive sub-regions, including Luján de Cuyo and the Uco Valley, is the source of some of the country’s finest wines.

For many wine lovers, Mendoza is practically synonymous with Malbec. Originally a Bordelaise variety brought to Argentina by the French in the mid-1800s, here it found success and renown that it never knew in its homeland where a finicky climate gives mixed results. Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Merlot and Pinot Noir are all widely planted here as well (and sometimes even blended with each other or Malbec). Mendoza's main white varieties include Chardonnay, Torrontés, Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon.

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

How to Serve Red Wine

A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines.

How Long Does Red Wine Last?

Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

NDF63897_2018 Item# 1151291

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