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Jefferson Estate Reserve Red 2001

Other Red Blends from Virginia
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    Winemaker Notes

    Our 2001 Estate Reserve is a tribute to our location and its microclimate. The rich ripe flavors that were developed in the 2001 vintage are an example of what can be achieved under the ideal growing conditions. This wine is a well-balanced blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Malbec. The Merlot offers ripe black cherry and raspberry flavors that are backed by moderate tannins and a hint of oak from the Cabernet Sauvignon. The Malbec offers a high concentration of fruit and a hint of spice. This full-bodied blend will age for four to six years. Serve our Estate Reserve with beef, lamb and game.

    Alcohol: 13.0% by volume

    Critical Acclaim

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    Jefferson

    Jefferson Vineyards

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    Jefferson Vineyards, Virginia
    In 1774, Thomas Jefferson convinced an Italian winemaker, Filippo Mazzei, to move onto land adjoining Jefferson's home, Monticello, located in Charlottesville, Virginia. At Jefferson's urging, Mazzei agreed to grow European vinifera wines, and he soon produced two barrels of wine from six of the best varieties of wild grapes. Upon sampling his creation, Mazzei was very pleased with Virginia's grapes and soil. He found Virginia land to be superior to that of Italy: "In my opinion, when the country is populated in proportion to its extent, the best wine in the world will be made here...I do not believe that nature is so favorable to growing vines in any country as this."

    In 1981, on the same land that Mazzei first planted his vines, Jefferson Vineyards was established, fulfilling a vision conceived some 200 years earlier. Today, Jefferson Vineyards produces numerous award-winning wines on 650 acres of historic land high atop the Monticello Appelation.

    Virginia

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    Diversity of landscape, terrain and climate make Virginia one of the most exciting American wine producing states today. Its viticultural history reaches as far back as 1607 when early settlers made the first wine from indigenous American grapes.

    Thomas Jefferson imported the first French varieties to Virginia and grew the Vitis vinifera species (the European species), though not with great success.

    Today, however, increased knowledge and optimal vineyard management techniques bring prosperity with a great number of diverse varieties. Virginia’s varied landscape has created seven distinct AVAs (American Viticultural Areas).

    Encouraged by an enthusiastic state government, fine wine production in Virginia continues to flourish. The state achieves success with a variety of wine types and styles including sparkling wines, Bordeaux Blends, Nebbiolo, Chardonnay, Viognier and less common whites like Petit Manseng and Vermentino.

    Other Red Blends

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    With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

    DIM71401_2001 Item# 73895