Col de Salici Col di Salice Rose di Salici Brut Front Label
Col de Salici Col di Salice Rose di Salici Brut Front LabelCol de Salici Col di Salice Rose di Salici Brut Front Bottle ShotCol de Salici Col di Salice Rose di Salici Brut Back Bottle Shot

Col de Salici Col di Salice Rose di Salici Brut

    750ML / 0% ABV
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    4.2 23 Ratings
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    4.2 23 Ratings
    750ML / 0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Delicate pink in color this wine features bright highlights. It is crisp, lively and fresh, full of ripe cherry and berry flavors. The body is exceptionally light and satiny. It has a pleasing long, dry finish.

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    Col de Salici

    Col de Salici

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    Col de Salici, Italy
    Col de Salici Winery Image
    Born from an ‘idea of Giancarlo Notari (which had the considerable experience of over thirty years in the wine market as a sales executive with Marchesi Antinori) the “Compagnia” now has two partners: the Family Notari and the Marchesi Antinori Srl that from the beginning believed in this project and allowed for the initial start up.

    Today there are four brands that belong to the group, all coming from wine areas of high interest: “Col de Salici” producing prosecco in Conegliano Valdobbiadene (Veneto Region) “ Grillesino” producing Morellino di Sacnsano in Maremma (Tuscany), “La Diacceta” producing Vernaccia from San Gimignano area (Tuscany) and “Chapelle de la Croix” producing Sauvignon Blanc and Muscat in France.

    Col de’ Salici is the first brand of the Company, created in 1997; Prosecco was not so popular at that time but Giancarlo Notari was able to see in it the modern, informal, light-hearted Italian drinking style that everyone loves and enjoys today. The grapes selected for the production of our proseccos all come from wines cultivated in the DOC and the DOCG area in Conegliano Valdobbiadene where the highest quality of Prosecco (the “Superiore”) is produced. This, together with the use of the most modern techniques in the cellar and an elegant packaging, place Col de Salici among the truly great producer for this amazing sparkling from northern Italy.

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    Producing every style of wine and with great success, the Veneto is one of the most multi-faceted wine regions of Italy.

    Veneto's appellation called Valpolicella (meaning “valley of cellars” in Italian) is a series of north to south valleys and is the source of the region’s best red wine with the same name. Valpolicella—the wine—is juicy, spicy, tart and packed full of red cherry flavors. Corvina makes up the backbone of the blend with Rondinella, Molinara, Croatina and others playing supporting roles. Amarone, a dry red, and Recioto, a sweet wine, follow the same blending patterns but are made from grapes left to dry for a few months before pressing. The drying process results in intense, full-bodied, heady and often, quite cerebral wines.

    Soave, based on the indigenous Garganega grape, is the famous white here—made ultra popular in the 1970s at a time when quantity was more important than quality. Today one can find great values on whites from Soave, making it a perfect choice as an everyday sipper! But the more recent local, increased focus on low yields and high quality winemaking in the original Soave zone, now called Soave Classico, gives the real gems of the area. A fine Soave Classico will exhibit a round palate full of flavors such as ripe pear, yellow peach, melon or orange zest and have smoky and floral aromas and a sapid, fresh, mineral-driven finish.

    Much of Italy’s Pinot grigio hails from the Veneto, where the crisp and refreshing style is easy to maintain; the ultra-popular sparkling wine, Prosecco, comes from here as well.

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    What are the different types of Champagne and sparkling wine?

    Beloved for its lively bubbles, sparkling wine is the ultimate beverage for any festivity, whether it's a major celebration or a mere merrymaking of nothing much! Sparkling wine is made throughout the winemaking world, but only can be called “Champagne” if it comes from the Champagne region of France and is made using what is referred to as the "traditional method." Other regions have their own specialties—Crémant in other parts of France, Cava in Spain and Prosecco in Italy, to name a few. New World regions like California, Australia and New Zealand enjoy the freedom to make many styles, with production methods and traditions defined locally. In a dry style, Champagne and sparkling wine goes with just about any type of food. Sweet styles are not uncommon and among both dry and sweet, you'll find white, rosé—or even red!—examples.

    How is Champagne and sparkling wine made?

    Champagne, Crémant, Cava and many other sparkling wines of the world are made using the traditional method, in which the second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) takes place inside the bottle. With this method, spent yeast cells remain in contact with the wine during bottle aging, giving it a creamy mouthful, toasted bread or brioche qualities and in many cases, the capacity to age. For Prosecco, the carbonation process usually occurs in a stainless steel tank (before bottling) to preserve the fresh fruity and floral aromas imminent in this style.

    What gives Champagne and sparkling wine its bubbles?

    The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel.

    How do you serve Champagne and sparkling wine?

    Ideally for storing Champagne and sparkling wine in any long-term sense, they should be at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool Champagne and sparkling wine down to about 40F to 50F. (Most refrigerators are colder than this.) As for drinking Champagne and sparkling wine, the best glasses have a stem and flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) to show.

    How long does Champagne and sparkling wine last?

    Most sparkling wines like Prosecco, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Wines made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

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    *New customers only. One-time use per customer. Order must be placed by 11/26/2020. The $20 discount is given for a single order with a minimum of $75 excluding shipping and tax. Items with pricing ending in .97 are excluded and will not count toward the minimum required. Discount does not apply to corporate orders, gift certificates, StewardShip membership fees, select Champagne brands, Riedel glassware, fine and rare wine, 187ML splits, and all bottles 3.0 liters or larger. No other promotion codes, coupon codes or corporate discounts may be applied to order.

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