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Chateau La Dauphine (Futures Pre-sale) 2010

Bordeaux Red Blends from Fronsac, Bordeaux, France
  • WS93
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Winemaker Notes

Critical Acclaim

WS 93
Wine Spectator

A bright, lively, floral style, with lots of raspberry and cherry fruit. A floral edge hangs on through the long, licorice-filled finish.
Barrel Sample: 90-93 Points

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Chateau La Dauphine

Chateau La Dauphine

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Chateau La Dauphine, , France - Bordeaux
Chateau La Dauphine
In 1709, J-F Proteau sold La Dauphine to the Olivier family. At the time, Jean Olivier was an advisor to the King and Chief Finances Clerk for Guyenne. La Dauphine remained in the same family for almost three centuries.

The château was built between 1744 and 1750 by Jean-Baptiste de Richon, a lawyer at the Parliament of Paris, and a Civil and Criminal Judge in the Duchy of Fronsac. Shortly after its construction, Maria Josepha of Saxony, the Dauphine of France, wife of Louis-Ferdinand de France (the Dauphin, son of Louis XV), and mother of several of the last Kings of France (including Louis XVI) stayed at the château for a few days. This event contributed to the property’s reputation.

In 1985, François-Régis Marcetteau de Brem, the last descendant of the Olivier family, sold La Dauphine to the Moueix family of Libourne (who also own Petrus, Château Trotanoy and Magdeleine). In 2000, Jean Halley (a former director and co-founder of the Promodes group) acquired Château de La Dauphine. Jean Halley, who died in 2011, and his son, Guillaume, undertook major investments to enhance the expression of the terroir and further develop the property’s reputation.

Uco Valley

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With a winning combination of cool weather, high elevation, and well-draining soil...

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With a winning combination of cool weather, high elevation, and well-draining soil, it is no surprise that Mendoza’s Uco Valley is one of the most exciting up-and-coming wine regions in Argentina. Healthy, easy-to-manage vines produce low yields of high-quality fruit, which in turn create flavorful, full-bodied wines with generous acidity.

This is the source of some of the best Malbec in Mendoza, which can range from value-priced to ultra-premium. Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Chardonnay also perform well here.

Known for its big, bold flavors and supple texture...

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Known for its big, bold flavors and supple texture, Malbec is most famous for its runaway success in Argentina. However, the variety actually originates in Bordeaux, where it historically contributed color and tannin to blends but was susceptible to viticultural problems. After being nearly wiped out by a devastating frost in 1956, it was never significantly replanted, although it did flourish under the name Côt in nearby Cahors. Malbec was brought to Argentina in 1868 by a French agronomist who saw great potential for the variety in Mendoza’s hot, high-altitude landscape, but did not gain its current reputation as the national grape of Argentina until a surge in popularity in the late 20th century thanks to its easy-going drinkability.

In the Glass

Malbec typically expresses deep flavors of freshly turned earth, black fruits from berries to plums, and licorice, appropriately backed by dense, chewy tannins. In warmer, New World regions, such as Mendoza, it can be quite intense and often needs time to mellow before becoming drinkable. In the Old World, its rusticity shines, with aged examples showing dusty notes of leather and tobacco. The best examples in all regions often possess a beguiling bouquet of violets.

Perfect Parings

Malbec’s rustic character begs for flavorful dishes, like spicy grilled sausages or the classic cassoulet of France’s Southwest. South American iterations are best enjoyed as they would be in Argentina: with a thick, juicy steak.

Sommelier Secret

If you’re trying to please a crowd, Malbec is generally a safe bet. With its combination of bold flavors and soft tannins, it will appeal to basically anyone who enjoys red wine. Malbec also wins bonus points for affordability, as even the most inexpensive examples are often quite good.

CVBLADAUP_2010 Item# 110278

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