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William Fevre Chablis Bougros Cote Bouguerots Grand Cru 2009

Chardonnay from Chablis, Burgundy, France
  • BH95
  • RP92
0% ABV
  • WS93
  • RP93
  • BH96
  • WS95
  • RP95
  • BH95
  • WE94
  • W&S93
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4.5 1 Ratings
0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Great complexity on the bouquet, with a robust structure and well weighted mouthfeel.

Pairs well with fish, shellfish and other seafood, grilled or in a cream sauce. Poultry and white meat, grilled or in a cream sauce.

Critical Acclaim

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BH 95
Burghound.com
This is a big step up in refinement, particularly aromatically with an abundance of oyster shell and tidal pool nuances that add breadth to the white flower, citrus and Chablis-style green fruit. The rich, powerful and mouth coating flavors possess real drive but also beautiful detail on the intensely mineral-driven finish that possesses outstanding length. This is really quite dry, at least within the context of the 2009 vintage. In a word, terrific.
RP 92
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2009 Chablis Bougros Cote Bougerots is made from a steep, south-facing parcel in Bougros. It shows fabulous intensity and depth in its round, generous fruit. This really fills out on the mid-palate and finish. The radiance of the fruit makes this one of the more approachable 2009 grand crus for near and mid-term drinking, although it may age quite a bit longer based on the sheer density of its fruit.
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William Fevre

William Fevre

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William Fevre, , France - Other regions
William Fevre
With a family history dating back 250 years in the Chablis region, William Fèvre’s father was already a great wine-maker after World War II. His son William founded the Domaine de la Maladière and announced his first harvest in 1959. For many years, William Fèvre (who to this day enjoys a very good reputation as a defender of historically renowned terroirs), has worked each plot keenly and skillfully so as to make wine whose personality reflects the authenticity of the soils from which they spring.

In 1998, the venerable Henriot family from Champagne succeeded him. The Domaine was taken up with the desire to make indisputably genuine and fine wines, bringing along a very personal expertise in Chardonnay. All the efforts have but one goal – to finely express the most subtle variations in the greatest Chablis crus.

William Fèvre owns the widest array of Grands Crus and benefits from ideal conditions to produce excellent Chablis. Located on “historical” terroirs, dating from before the extension of the vineyard areas that occurred in the 1970’s, the William Fèvre Domaine is at the very heart of the vineyards, on soil that mixes marl and clay-rich lime, as well as a Kimmeridgian subsoil rich in minerals and oyster fossils that give Chablis its unique mineral character.

Australia

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A large, climatically diverse country producing just about every wine style imaginable, Australia is often misunderstood by consumers. It is not just a source of blockbuster Shiraz or inexpensive wine with cute critters on the label, though both can certainly be found here. It is impossible to make generalizations about a country this physically massive, but most regions are concentrated in the south of the country and experience either warm, dry weather, or more humid, tropical influence. Australia has for several decades been at the forefront of winemaking technology and has widely adopted the use of screwcaps, even for some premium and ultra-premium bottles.

Shiraz is indeed Australia’s most celebrated and widely planted variety, typically producing bold, supple reds with sweet, jammy fruit and performing best in the Barossa and Hunter Valleys. Cabernet Sauvignon is often blended with Shiraz, and also shines on its own particularly in Coonawarra and Margaret River. Grenache and Mourvèdre (often locally referred to as Mataro) are also popular, both on their own and alongside Shiraz in Rhône blends. Chardonnay is common throughout the country and made in a wide range of styles. Sauvignon Blanc has recently surged in popularity to compete with New Zealand’s distinctive version, and Semillon is often utilized as its blending partner, or in the Hunter Valley, on its own to make complex, age-worthy whites. Riesling thrives in the cool-climate Clare and Eden Valleys. Sticky-sweet fortified wine Rutherglen Muscat is a beloved regional specialty of Victoria. Thanks to the country’s relatively agreeable climate throughout and the openness of its people, experimentation is common and ongoing and there is a vast array of intriguing varieties to be found.

Cabernet Sauvignon

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A noble variety bestowed with both power and concentration, Cabernet Sauvignon is sometimes referred to as the “king” of red grapes. It can be somewhat unapproachable early in its youth but has the potential to age beautifully, with the ability to last fifty years or more at its best. Small berries and tough skins provide its trademark firm tannic grip, while high acidity helps to keep the wine fresh for decades. Cabernet Sauvignon flourishes in temperate climates like Bordeaux's Medoc region (and in St-Emillion and Pomerol, where it plays a supporting role to Merlot). The top Médoc producers use Cabernet Sauvignon for their wine’s backbone, blending it with Merlot and smaller amounts of Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and/or Petit Verdot. On its own, Cabernet Sauvignon has enjoyed great success throughout the world, particularly in the Napa Valley, and is responsible for some of the world’s most prestigious and sought-after “cult” wines.

In the Glass

High in color, tannin, and extract, Cabernet Sauvignon expresses notes of blackberry, cassis, plum, currant, spice, and tobacco. In Bordeaux and elsewhere in the Old World you'll find the more earthy, tannic side of Cabernet, where it's typically blended to soften tannins and add complexity. In warmer regions like California and Australia, you can typically expect more ripe fruit flavors upfront.

Perfect Pairings

Cabernet Sauvignon is right at home with rich, intense meat dishes—beef, lamb, and venison, in particular—where its opulent fruit and decisive tannins make an equal match to the dense protein of the meat. With a mature Cabernet, opt for tender, slow-cooked meat dishes.

Sommelier Secrets

Despite the modern importance and ubiquity of Cabernet Sauvignon, it is actually a relatively young variety. In 1997, DNA revealed the grape to be a spontaneous crossing of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc which took place in 17th century southwestern France.

VTMBOUGUEROTS_2009 Item# 129405

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