Villa Wolf Pinot Noir Rose 2015 Front Label
Villa Wolf Pinot Noir Rose 2015 Front Label

Villa Wolf Pinot Noir Rose 2015

Rosé from Germany
  • WE90
750ML / 12% ABV
Other Vintages
  • WW90
  • JS90
  • WW89
  • WE89
All Vintages
Currently Unavailable $12.99
Try the 2019 Vintage 15 99
12 99
12 99
Save $0.00 (0%)
Ships Tomorrow
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
1
Limit Reached
0.0 0 Ratings
MyWine Share
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Have you tried this? Rate it now
(256 characters remaining)

0.0 0 Ratings
750ML / 12% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The Pfalz is a very warm and sunny region, often called the "Tuscany of Germany," so all of the Pinot varieties do well here. The Villa Wolf Pinot Noir Rosé is a true rose, made with a brief maceration before pressing to extract color. It is light and refreshing, with deliciously bright berry and fruit flavors and a clean, zippy finish.

This wine is perfect for holiday meals, especially when ham is involved.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WE 90
Wine Enthusiast
Intense mineral tones of smoke and crushed slate collide with fresh red cherry and raspberry flavors on the palate of this bang-for-your-buck rose. Its concentrated fruit flavors are luscious and satisfying but also vibrantly structured, proving dexterous beyond the apéritif hour.
View More
Villa Wolf

Villa Wolf

View all products
Villa Wolf, Germany
Villa Wolf Erni Loosen, Proprietor of Villa Wolf Winery Image

Famed Mosel Riesling winemaker Ernst Loosen purchased the Villa Wolf Estate in the Pfalz village of Wachenheim in 1996. Of course Villa Wolf produces excellent, mineral-driven dry rieslings from the estate’s sandstone, limestone and basalt soils. But its focus on Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris have generated more attention. The Pinot Noir Rose in particular is downright addictive. All of the Villa Wolf wines are clean, pure, bright, focused and extremely food-friendly. They also represent superb value. Erni Loosen calls his second winery “True Pfalz”.

Image for German Wine content section
View all products

As the world’s northernmost fine wine producing region, Germany faces some of the most extreme climatic and topographic challenges in viticulture. But fortunately this country’s star variety, Riesling, is cold-hardy enough to survive freezing winters, and has enough natural acidity to create balance, even in wines with the highest levels of residual sugar. Riesling responds splendidly to Germany’s variable terroir, allowing the country to build its reputation upon fine wines at all points of the sweet to dry spectrum, many of which can age for decades.

Classified by ripeness at harvest, Riesling can be picked early for dry wines or as late as January following the harvest for lusciously sweet wines. There are six levels in Germany’s ripeness classification, ordered from driest to sweetest: Kabinett, Spätlese, Auslese, Beerenauslese, Trockenbeerenauslese and Eiswein (ice wine). While these classifications don’t exactly match the sweetness levels of the finished wines, the Kabinett category will include the drier versions and anything above Auslese will have noticeable—if not noteworthy—sweetness. Eiswein is always remarkably sweet.

Other important white varieties include Müller-Thurgau as well as Grauburguner (Pinot Gris) and Weissburguner (Pinot Blanc). The red, Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir), grown in warmer pockets of the country can be both elegant and structured.

As the fourth largest wine producer in Europe (after France, Italy and Spain), in contrast to its more Mediterranean neighbors, Germany produces about as much as it consumes—and is also the largest importer of wine in the E.U.

Image for Rosé Wine content section
View all products

Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color depends on grape variety and winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta.

WBO30181869_2015 Item# 176288

Internet Explorer is no longer supported.
Please use a different browser like Edge, Chrome or Firefox to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to make the switch.
Enjoy better browsing and increased security.

Yes, Update Now
Cheers to You!

New Customers! Save $20 off $100*. Code NEW2021

New Customers! Save $20 off $100*. Code NEW2021

There was an error redeeming your code.

*New customers only. One-time use per customer. Order must be placed by 3/31/2021. The $20 discount is given for a single order with a minimum of $100 excluding shipping and tax. Items with pricing ending in .97 are excluded and will not count toward the minimum required. Discount does not apply to corporate orders, gift certificates, StewardShip membership fees, select Champagne brands, Riedel glassware, fine and rare wine, 187ML splits, Picked by Wine.com subscriptions, and all bottles 3.0 liters or larger. No other promotion codes, coupon codes or corporate discounts may be applied to order. Offer valid subject to state law limitations.

Search for ""

Processing Your Order...